Gentlemen's Agreement (film)

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Gentlemen's Agreement
Gentlemen's Agreement (film).jpg
Directed by George Pearson
Written byJennifer Howard
Basil Mason
Produced by Anthony Havelock-Allan
Starring Frederick Peisley
Vivien Leigh
Anthony Holles
CinematographyM. A. Andersen
Edited byRoland Reed
Music by Lee Zahler
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
April 1935
Running time
71 minutes
CountriesUnited Kingdom
United States
Language English

Gentlemen's Agreement is a 1935 British, black-and-white, adventure film directed by George Pearson and starring Frederick Peisley as Guy Carfax and Vivien Leigh as Phil Stanley. [1] It was produced by British & Dominions Film Corporation and Paramount British Pictures. According to the British Film Institute, there is no known print of this film.

Contents

Synopsis

A young doctor realises that his father is a quack.

Cast

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 3 September 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2011.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)