East Lynne on the Western Front

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East Lynne on the Western Front
East Lynne on the Western Front.jpg
Directed by George Pearson
Written by
Produced by T.A. Welsh
Starring
Cinematography Percy Strong
Production
company
Distributed by Gaumont British Distributors
Release date
15 July 1931
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

East Lynne on the Western Front is a 1931 British comedy film directed by George Pearson and starring Herbert Mundin, Mark Daly and Alf Goddard. [1] It was made at the Lime Grove Studios. [2]

Contents

Plot

During the First World War a group of British soldiers serving on the Western Front stage a comic performance of the play East Lynne to entertain their comrades.

Cast

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Wood p.71

Bibliography