Helaine Selin

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Helaine Selin (born 1946) is an American librarian, historian of science, ethnomathematician, author and the editor of several bestselling books.

Contents

Career

Selin attended Binghamton University, where she earned her bachelor's degree. [1] She received her MLS from SUNY Albany. [1] She was a Peace Corps volunteer [1] from the fall of 1967 through the summer of 1969 as an English teacher in Malawi. She retired in 2012 from being the science librarian at Hampshire College.

Selin is well known for being the editor of Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures (1997) which is one of the first books which allows readers to "compare a variety of traditional systems of mathematics and cosmologies." [2] Mathematics Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Mathematics (2000), is considered by Mathematical Intelligencer as a companion to the Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures. [3] The journal, Mathematics and Computer Education , wrote that Mathematics Across Cultures filled a gap in the history of mathematics and was "an exciting collection of papers on ethnomathematics." [4] Selin's editorial work, Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures (2003), was considered by Polylog to be a "valuable source for intercultural philosophers." [5] Selin edited the Encyclopaedia of Classical Indian Sciences (2007). [6] She has also edited several more books in the Science Across Cultures series: Medicine Across Cultures, Nature and the Environment Across Cultures, Childbirth Across Cultures, Parenting Across Cultures, Happiness Across Cultures and Death Across Cultures.

Bibliography

"Death Across Cultures: Death and Dying in Non-Western Cultures", Dordrecht, New York: Springer, 2019.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "About Helaine". Helaine Selin. Hampshire College. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  2. Merson, John (1999). "A Massive Compendium - But No CD-Rom!" . Metascience. 8: 494. Retrieved 22 January 2016 via EBSCO.
  3. Bellosta, Héléne (2005). "Mathematics Across Cultures". Mathematical Intelligencer. 27 (2): 85–88. doi:10.1007/BF02985803. S2CID   121462154.
  4. Rauff, James V. (1 October 2002). "Mathematics across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Mathematics". Mathematics and Computer Education. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2016 via HighBeam Research.
  5. Baatz, Ursula (2004). "Nature Across Cultures". Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy. ISSN   1616-2943 . Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  6. "An Authentic Version of History of Indian Science". The Hindu. 9 January 2007. Retrieved 22 January 2016.