Henry Herbert (Parliamentarian)

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Henry Herbert (born 1617) was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons of England between 1642 and 1654. He fought in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Herbert was the son of William Herbert of Coldbrook. He matriculated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford on 10 October 1634 and entered Middle Temple in the same year. [1]

William Herbert was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons of England in 1626.

Middle Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

In March 1642, Herbert was elected Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire in the Long Parliament. [2] He was a colonel in the Parliamentary army and took Cardiff in September 1645 and then Swansea. He was one of the parliamentary commissioners for Monmouthshire in 1646 and took a prominent in the Commonwealth. He was appointed a member of High Court of Justice on 25 June 1651. He was a member of 4th Council of State from 19 November 1651 to November 1652 and was placed on the committee of law and the committee for preserving of timber on 2 December 1651. He was appointed Commissioner of Militia for Monmouthshire on 14 March 1654. [1] In 1654 he was re-elected MP for Monmouthshire in the First Protectorate Parliament. [2] He was given £3000 and the plunder of Raglan Castle. His brother Major William Herbert was a commissioner of array for the King. [1]

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Cardiff Capital and largest city of Wales

Cardiff is the capital of Wales, and its largest city. The eleventh-largest city in the United Kingdom, it is Wales's chief commercial centre, the base for most national cultural institutions and Welsh media, and the seat of the National Assembly for Wales. At the 2011 census, the unitary authority area population was estimated to be 346,090, and the wider urban area 479,000. Cardiff is a significant tourist centre and the most popular visitor destination in Wales with 21.3 million visitors in 2017. In 2011, Cardiff was ranked sixth in the world in National Geographic's alternative tourist destinations.

Herbert married Mary Rudyard, daughter of John Rudyard, grocer of London. After his death she married William Herbert of Cogan as his second wife. [1]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir Charles Williams
William Herbert
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1642–1653
With: William Herbert
Succeeded by
Philip Jones
Preceded by
Philip Jones
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1654
With: Richard Cromwell
Philip Jones
Thomas Morgan
Thomas Hughes
Succeeded by
Major General James Berry
John Nicholas
Edward Herbert