Monmouthshire (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 51°46′05″N2°48′40″W / 51.768°N 2.811°W / 51.768; -2.811

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Contents

Monmouthshire
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
1536–1885
Number of membersTwo
Replaced by North Monmouthshire, South Monmouthshire, West Monmouthshire

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons, officially the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Owing to shortage of space, its office accommodation extends into Portcullis House.

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it united with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Parliament of Great Britain parliament from 1708 to 1800

The Parliament of Great Britain was formed in 1707 following the ratification of the Acts of Union by both the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. The Acts created a new unified Kingdom of Great Britain and dissolved the separate English and Scottish parliaments in favour of a single parliament, located in the former home of the English parliament in the Palace of Westminster, near the City of London. This lasted nearly a century, until the Acts of Union 1800 merged the separate British and Irish Parliaments into a single Parliament of the United Kingdom with effect from 1 January 1801.

In 1885 the Monmouthshire constituency was divided to create North Monmouthshire, South Monmouthshire and West Monmouthshire.

Northern Monmouthshire was a parliamentary constituency in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Southern Monmouthshire was a parliamentary constituency in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Western Monmouthshire was a parliamentary constituency in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Boundaries

The Monmouthshire constituency covered the county of Monmouth, except that from 1832 there was a borough constituency, Monmouth Boroughs, within the county.

Monmouthshire (historic) one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales

Monmouthshire, also known as the County of Monmouth, is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county. It corresponds approximately to the present principal areas of Monmouthshire, Blaenau Gwent, Newport and Torfaen, and those parts of Caerphilly and Cardiff east of the Rhymney River.

Monmouth Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency consisting of several towns in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England, Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom; until 1832 the constituency was known simply as Monmouth, though it included other "contributory boroughs".

Members of Parliament

MPs 1542–1885

YearFirst memberSecond member
1542No names known
1545 Walter Herbert Charles Herbert [1]
1547 Sir Thomas Morgan William Herbert [1]
1553 (Mar)
1553 (Oct) Sir Charles Herbert Thomas Somerset [1]
1554 (Apr) Thomas Herbert James Gunter [1]
1554 (Nov) Thomas Somerset David Lewis [1]
1555 William Herbert William Morgan [1]
1558 Francis Somerset William Morgan [1]
1559 (Jan) William Morgan I Thomas Herbert [2]
1562–1563 Matthew Herbert George Herbert [2]
1571 Charles Somerset William Morgan [2]
1572 (May) Charles Somerset Henry Herbert [2]
1584 (Sep) Sir William Herbert Edward Morgan [2]
1586 (Sep) Sir William Herbert Edward Morgan [2]
1588 (Oct) Thomas Morgan II William John Proger [2]
1593 Sir William Herbert (died in office, 1593) Edward Kemeys [2]
1597 (Sep) Henry Herbert John Arnold [2]
1601 (Oct) Thomas Somerset Henry Morgan [2]
1604 Thomas Somerset Sir John Herbert
1614 Walter Montagu William Jones
1621 Sir Edmund Morgan Charles Williams
1624 Robert Viscount Lisle Sir William Morgan
1625 Robert Viscount Lisle Sir William Morgan
1626 Nicholas Arnold William Herbert
1628 Nicholas Arnold Nicholas Kemeys
1629–1640No Parliaments convened
Apr 1640 William Morgan Walter Rumsey
Nov 1640 Sir Charles Williams
repl. 1642 by Henry Herbert
William Herbert, disabled 1644
1645 John Herbert Henry Herbert
1648 John Herbert Henry Herbert
1653 Philip Jones

MPs 1654–1660

YearFirst memberSecond memberThird member
1654 Richard Cromwell, sat for Hampshire
repl. by
Thomas Morgan
Philip Jones sat for Glamorgan
repl. by
Thomas Hughes
Henry Herbert
1656 Major General James Berry, sat for Worcestershire
repl. by Nathaniel Waterhouse
John Nicholas Edward Herbert
1659 William Morgan John Nicholas

MPs 1660–1885

YearFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
1660 (CP) Henry Somerset, 1st Duke of Beaufort William Morgan
1661
1667 Sir Trevor Williams, Bt Whig
Feb 1679 Charles, Lord Herbert
Aug 1679 Sir Trevor Williams, Bt Whig
1680 Sir Edward Morgan, Bt
1681
1685 Charles, Marquess of Worcester Sir Charles Kemeys, Bt
1689 (CP) Sir Trevor Williams, Bt Whig
1690 Thomas Morgan
1695 Sir Charles Kemeys, Bt
1698 Sir John Williams, Bt
1700
1701 (Jan) John Morgan Whig
1705 Sir Hopton Williams, Bt
1708 Thomas Windsor
1710
1712 James Gunter
Apr 1713 Thomas Lewis
Sep 1713 Sir Charles Kemeys, Bt
1715 Thomas Lewis
1720 John Hanbury Whig
1722 William Morgan, the Elder Whig
1727
1731 Lord Charles Somerset
1734 Thomas Morgan, the Elder
1735 Charles Hanbury Williams
1741
1747 William Morgan, the Younger Whig Capel Hanbury
1754
1761
1763 Thomas Morgan, the Younger
1766 John Hanbury Whig
1768
1771 John Morgan
1774
1780
1784 Henry, Viscount Nevill
1785 James Rooke
1790
1792 Robert Salusbury
1796 Lt Col Sir Charles Morgan Whig [3]
1802
1805 Capt Lord Arthur Somerset
1806
1807
1812
1816 Lord Granville Somerset Tory [3]
1818
1820
1826
1830
1831 William Addams Williams Whig [3]
1832
1834 Conservative
1835
1837
1841 Octavius Morgan Conservative [3]
1847
1848 Edward Arthur Somerset Conservative
1852
1857
1859 Col Poulett Somerset Conservative
1865
1868
1871 Lord Henry Somerset Conservative
1874 Col Frederick Morgan Conservative
1880 John Rolls Conservative
1885 Constituency divided into North Monmouthshire, South Monmouthshire, and West Monmouthshire

Election results

Elections in the 1840s

Williams resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 9 February 1841: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Conservative gain from Whig
General election 1841: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Granville Somerset Unopposed
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Registered electors 4,393
Conservative hold
Conservative gain from Whig

Somerset was appointed Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, requiring a by-election.

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster ministerial office in Her Majestys Government

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is a ministerial office in the Government of the United Kingdom that includes as part of its duties, the administration of the estates and rents of the Duchy of Lancaster. Since July 2019, the Chancellor also has responsibility for advising the Prime Minister on policy development and implementation.

By-election, 24 September 1841: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Granville Somerset Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1847: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan 2,334 34.6 N/A
Conservative Granville Somerset 2,230 33.0 N/A
Conservative Edward Arthur Somerset 2,18732.4N/A
Majority430.6N/A
Turnout 3,376 (est)63.9 (est)N/A
Registered electors 5,286
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Somerset's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 24 March 1848: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Edward Arthur Somerset Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Conservative Edward Arthur Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 4,973
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1857: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Conservative Edward Arthur Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 5,099
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1859: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Conservative Edward Arthur Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 5,073
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Somerset resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Manor of Hempholme, causing a by-election.

By-election, 1 July 1859: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Poulett Somerset Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1865: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan Unopposed
Conservative Poulett Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 4,909
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1868: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Octavius Morgan 3,761 39.1 N/A
Conservative Poulett Somerset 3,525 36.6 N/A
Liberal Henry Morgan-Clifford 2,33824.3N/A
Majority1,18712.3N/A
Turnout 5,981 (est)75.0 (est)N/A
Registered electors 7,971
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1870s

Somerset resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 4 Mar 1871: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Henry Somerset Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1874: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Frederick Courtenay Morgan Unopposed
Conservative Henry Somerset Unopposed
Registered electors 7,630
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Somerset was appointed Comptroller of the Household, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 17 Mar 1874: Monmouthshire [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Henry Somerset Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Monmouthshire [4] [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Frederick Courtenay Morgan 3,529 27.6 N/A
Conservative John Rolls 3,294 25.8 N/A
Liberal George Charles Brodrick 3,01923.6N/A
Liberal Marshall Warmington 2,92722.9N/A
Majority2752.2N/A
Turnout 6,385 (est)75.0 (est)N/A
Registered electors 8,518
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "History of Parliament" . Retrieved 30 August 2011.[ dead link ]
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History of Parliament" . Retrieved 30 August 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 217–218. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885(e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 528–529. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  5. "The Liberal Candidates for Monmouthshire" . South Wales Daily News. 22 August 1885. p. 3. Retrieved 21 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.