Nathaniel Waterhouse

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Nathaniel Waterhouse
Nationality English
Occupation Member of Parliament

Nathaniel Waterhouse was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1656 and 1659.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Biography

Waterhouse was of the family of Waterhouse of Halifax and was a resident of Westminster. He was steward of the lands of Oliver Cromwell from 1651 to 1658. [1] In 1656, he was elected Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire for the Second Protectorate Parliament as a replacement for a member who chose another seat. [2] In 1659 he was servant to Richard Cromwell. [1] He was elected MP for Monmouth Boroughs for the Third Protectorate Parliament in 1659. [2]

Halifax, West Yorkshire Minster town in West Yorkshire, England

Halifax is a minster town in the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town has been a centre of woollen manufacture from the 15th century onward, originally dealing through the Piece Hall. Halifax is known for Mackintosh's chocolate and toffee products including Rolo and Quality Street. The Halifax Bank was also founded and is still headquartered in Halifax. Dean Clough, one of the largest textile factories in the world at more than 12 mile (800 m) long, was in the north of the town. The premises have since been converted for office and retail use including a gym, theatre, Travelodge and radio station.

Oliver Cromwell 17th-century English military and political leader

Oliver Cromwell was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic.

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Major General James Berry
Edward Herbert
John Nicholas
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1656
With: John Nicholas
Edward Herbert
Succeeded by
John Nicholas
William Morgan
Preceded by
Not represented in Second Protectorate Parliament
Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs
1659
Succeeded by
Thomas Pury