Edward Herbert (of the Grange)

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Edward Herbert was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1656. He was a prominent supporter of Oliver Cromwell.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Oliver Cromwell 17th-century English military and political leader

Oliver Cromwell was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic.

Herbert was described as Cromwell's right-hand man and was appointed member of High Court of Justice in June 1651. On 4 September 1655 he was in possession of the lands of The Grange probably by lease from the county commissioners for sequestration. The land was the property of Henry Lord Herbert of Raglan who petitioned on that date to be allowed quiet enjoyment of the estate. [1] In 1656, Herbert was elected Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire in the Second Protectorate Parliament. [2] By 1661 Herbert had removed to Bristol and was taken into custody for some reason on 10 November 1661. [1]

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

Second Protectorate Parliament

The Second Protectorate Parliament in England sat for two sessions from 17 September 1656 until 4 February 1658, with Thomas Widdrington as the Speaker of the House of Commons. In its first session, the House of Commons was its only chamber; in the second session an Other House with a power of veto over the decisions of the Commons was added.

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Henry Herbert
Thomas Hughes
Thomas Morgan
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1656
With: Major General James Berry
John Nicholas
Nathaniel Waterhouse
Succeeded by
John Nicholas
William Morgan