Montgomery (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
Montgomery
Former constituency
for the House of Commons
1542–1918
Number of membersone
Replaced by Montgomeryshire

Montgomery was a constituency in the House of Commons of England and later in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected one Member, but was abolished in 1918.

Contents

After 1832 the constituency was more usually called the Montgomery Boroughs or Montgomery District of Boroughs.

Boundaries

1885–1918

The constituency comprised the boroughs of Montgomery, Llanfyllin, Llanidloes, Newtown and Welshpool.

Members of Parliament

1542–1640

ParliamentMember
1542 William Herbert II [1]
1545 William Herbert II [1]
1547 William Herbert II [1]
1553 (Mar) Richard Herbert [1]
1553 (Oct) John ap Edmund [1]
1554 (Apr) Richard Lloyd [1]
1554 (Nov) Richard Lloyd [1]
1555not known
1558 William Herbert II [1]
1559 John Man [2]
1562/3 John Price
1571 Arthur Price
1572 Rowland Pugh, thought to be dead
repl. 1581 by
Richard Herbert I
1584 Richard Herbert II
1586 Matthew Herbert
1588 Rowland Pugh
1593 Richard Morgan
1597 Thomas Jukes
1601 John Harris

1601–1918

ElectionMemberParty
1601 John Harris
1604–1611 Edward Whittingham
1614 Sir John Danvers
1621–1622: Edward Herbert
1624 George Herbert
1625 George Herbert
1626 Sir Henry Herbert
1628 Sir Richard Lloyd
November 1640 Richard Herbert Royalist
September 1642Herbert disabled from sitting – seat vacant
1646 George Devereux [3]
1653Not represented in the Barebones Parliament and
the First and Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
January 1659 Charles Lloyd
May 1659 Not represented in the restored Rump
April 1660 (Sir) Thomas Myddelton [4]
1661 John Purcell
1665 Henry Herbert
1679 Matthew Pryce
April 1685 William Williams
July 1685 Charles Herbert
1691 Price Devereux
1701 John Vaughan
1705 Charles Mason
1708 John Pugh
1727 (Sir) William Corbet [5]
1741 James Cholmondeley
1747 Henry Herbert
1748 Francis Herbert
1754 William Bodvell
1759 Richard Clive
1771 Captain Frederick Cornewall
1774 Whitshed Keene
1818 Henry Clive Tory [6]
1832 David Pugh [7] Tory [6]
1833 by-election John Edwards Whig [6] [8]
1841 Hon. Hugh Cholmondeley Conservative [6]
1847 David Pugh [9] Conservative [6]
1861 by-election John Willes-Johnson Conservative
1863 by-election Hon. Charles Hanbury-Tracy Liberal
1877 by-election Hon. Frederick Hanbury-Tracy Liberal
1885 Pryce Pryce-Jones Conservative
1886 Hon. Frederick Hanbury-Tracy Liberal
1892 Sir Pryce Pryce-Jones Conservative
1895 Major Edward Pryce-Jones Conservative
1906 John Rees Liberal
Dec 1910 Colonel Edward Pryce-Jones Conservative

Elections

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Tory Henry Clive (MP)Unopposed
Registered electors c.135
Tory hold
General election 1831: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Tory Henry Clive (MP)Unopposed
Registered electors c.135
Tory hold
General election 1832: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Tory David Pugh 335 51.1
Whig John Edwards 32148.9
Majority142.2
Turnout 65690.7
Registered electors 723
Tory hold

The election was declared void on petition, causing a by-election.

By-election, 8 April 1833: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig John Edwards 331 50.8 +1.9
Tory Panton Corbett 32149.21.9
Majority101.6N/A
Turnout 65290.20.5
Registered electors 723
Whig gain from Tory Swing +1.9
General election 1835: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig John Edwards Unopposed
Registered electors 899
Whig gain from Conservative
General election 1837: Montgomery Boroughs [6] [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig John Edwards 472 51.6
Conservative Panton Corbett 44348.4
Majority293.2
Turnout 91588.2
Registered electors 1,037
Whig hold

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1841: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hugh Cholmondeley 464 51.5 +3.1
Whig John Edwards 43748.53.1
Majority273.0N/A
Turnout 90190.6+2.4
Registered electors 995
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +3.1
General election 1847: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative David Pugh 389 50.0 N/A
Conservative Hugh Cholmondeley 38950.01.5
Majority00.0N/A
Turnout 77879.211.4
Registered electors 982
Conservative hold Swing N/A

With both Cholmondeley and Pugh receiving the same number of votes, both were declared elected by the returning officer. However, Cholmondeley decided against defending his claim for the seat and Pugh was declared the only elected candidate.

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative David Pugh 435 59.2 +9.2
Radical George Hammond Whalley [12] [13] 30040.8New
Majority13518.4+18.4
Turnout 73573.35.9
Registered electors 1,003
Conservative hold
General election 1857: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative David Pugh Unopposed
Registered electors 927
Conservative hold
General election 1859: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative David Pugh Unopposed
Registered electors 900
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1860s

Pugh's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 4 May 1861: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Willes-Johnson Unopposed
Conservative hold

Willes-Johnson's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 20 August 1863: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Charles Hanbury-Tracy 439 57.1 New
Conservative Charles Vaughan Pugh [14] 33042.9N/A
Majority10914.2N/A
Turnout 76982.4N/A
Registered electors 933
Liberal gain from Conservative
General election 1865: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Charles Hanbury-Tracy 437 54.0 N/A
Conservative Thomas Lewis Hampton [15] 37246.0N/A
Majority658.0N/A
Turnout 80983.8N/A
Registered electors 965
Liberal gain from Conservative
General election 1868: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Charles Hanbury-Tracy Unopposed
Registered electors 2,559
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1870s

General election 1874: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Charles Hanbury-Tracy Unopposed
Registered electors 2,839
Liberal hold

Hanbury-Tracy succeeded to the peerage, becoming Lord Sudeley.

By-election, 17 May 1877: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Frederick Hanbury-Tracy 1,447 56.4 N/A
Conservative Charles Vane-Tempest 1,11843.6New
Majority32912.8N/A
Turnout 2,56588.0N/A
Registered electors 2,914
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: Montgomery Boroughs [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Frederick Hanbury-Tracy 1,572 56.5 N/A
Conservative Pryce Pryce-Jones 1,21143.5N/A
Majority36113.0N/A
Turnout 2,78389.2N/A
Registered electors 3,120
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Pryce-Jones Pryce Pryce-Jones.gif
Pryce-Jones
General election 1885: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Pryce Pryce-Jones 1,409 51.5 +8.0
Liberal Frederick Hanbury-Tracy 1,32648.5−8.0
Majority833.0N/A
Turnout 2,73591.2+2.0
Registered electors 2,999
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +8.0
General election 1886: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Frederick Hanbury-Tracy 1,424 53.2 +4.7
Conservative Pryce Pryce-Jones 1,25146.8−4.7
Majority1736.4N/A
Turnout 2,67589.2−2.0
Registered electors 2,999
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +4.7

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1892: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Pryce Pryce-Jones 1,406 52.2 +5.4
Liberal Frederick Hanbury-Tracy 1,28847.8−5.4
Majority1184.4N/A
Turnout 2,69491.8+2.6
Registered electors 2,936
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
Philipps Owen Philipps MP.jpg
Philipps
General election 1895: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Pryce-Jones 1,435 51.5 −0.7
Liberal Owen Philipps 1,35148.5+0.7
Majority843.0−1.4
Turnout 2,78691.9+0.1
Registered electors 3,030
Conservative hold Swing −0.7

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [18] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Pryce-Jones 1,478 53.0 +1.5
Liberal John Albert Bright 1,30947.0−1.5
Majority1696.0+3.0
Turnout 2,78786.3−5.6
Registered electors 3,229
Conservative hold Swing +1.5
Rees 1906 John David Rees MP.jpg
Rees
General election 1906: Montgomery Boroughs [16] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Rees 1,541 51.4 +4.4
Conservative Edward Pryce-Jones 1,45848.6−4.4
Majority832.8N/A
Turnout 2,99990.5+4.2
Registered electors 3,313
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +4.4

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Montgomery Boroughs [19] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Rees 1,539 50.2 −1.2
Conservative Edward Pryce-Jones 1,52649.8+1.2
Majority130.4−2.4
Turnout 3,06591.4+0.9
Registered electors 3,354
Liberal hold Swing −1.2
General election December 1910: Montgomery Boroughs [19] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Pryce-Jones 1,522 50.9 +1.1
Liberal John Rees 1,46849.1−1.1
Majority541.8N/A
Turnout 2,99089.1−2.3
Registered electors 3,354
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +1.1

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

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References

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  2. "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  3. Devereux is not known ever to have taken his seat
  4. Created a baronet, July 1660
  5. Created a baronet, October 1740
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. pp. 196–197. Retrieved 13 August 2019 via Google Books.
  7. On petition, the election of 1832 was declared void and a by-election held
  8. Churton, Edward (1838). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer. p. 80. Retrieved 13 August 2019 via Google Books.
  9. At the election of 1847, Hon. Hugh Cholmondeley and David Pugh tied, with 389 votes each, and the returning officer made a double return. However, when a petition was lodged against Cholmondeley he decided not to defend his claim, and Pugh took the seat.
  10. 1 2 Escott, Margaret. "Montgomery Boroughs". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832–1885(e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  12. "Election Intelligence" . Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. 17 July 1852. p. 7. Retrieved 22 August 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. "Montgomeryshire Boroughs" . Evening Mail. 12 July 1852. p. 5. Retrieved 22 August 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  14. "Political Intelligence" . Brighton Gazette. 6 August 1863. p. 7. Retrieved 5 March 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  15. "File NLW ex 1977 – Thomas L. Hampton Canvass Book". National Library of Wales . Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  17. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885–1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.
  18. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  19. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916