1847 United Kingdom general election

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1847 United Kingdom general election
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
  1841 29 July – 26 August 1847 (1847-07-29 1847-08-26) 1852  

All 656 seats in the House of Commons
329 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  14th Earl of Derby (cropped).jpg Lord john russell.jpg No image.svg
Leader Lord Stanley Lord John Russell John O'Connell
Party Conservative Whig Irish Repeal
Leader sinceJuly 1846October 184215 May 1847
Leader's seat House of Lords City of London Limerick City
Last election367 seats, 51.6%271 seats, 46.2%20 seats, 1.9%
Seats won325 [1] 29236
Seat changeDecrease2.svg42Increase2.svg21Increase2.svg16
Popular vote205,481259,31114,128
Percentage42.6%53.8%2.9%
SwingDecrease2.svg9.0%Increase2.svg7.6%Increase2.svg1.0%

Prime Minister before election

Lord John Russell
Whig

Prime Minister after election

Lord John Russell
Whig

The 1847 United Kingdom general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. However, the split among the Conservatives between the majority of Protectionists, led by Lord Stanley, and the minority of free traders, known also as the Peelites, led by former prime minister Sir Robert Peel, left the Whigs, led by Prime Minister Lord John Russell, in a position to continue in government.

Contents

The Irish Repeal group won more seats than in the previous general election, while the Chartists gained the only seat they were ever to hold, Nottingham's second seat, held by Chartist leader Feargus O'Connor.

The election also witnessed the election of Britain's first Jewish MP, the Liberal Lionel de Rothschild in the City of London. Members being sworn in were however required to swear the Christian Oath of Allegiance, meaning Rothschild was unable actually to take his seat until the passage of the Jews Relief Act in 1858.

Results

UK General Election 1847
PartySeatsGainsLossesNet gain/lossSeats %Votes %Votes+/−
  Whig 292+2144.5153.75259,311+6.9
  Conservative 3254249.5442.59205,4818.2
  Irish Repeal 36+165.492.9314,128+1.0
  Chartist 1 1 0+10.150.592,8480
  Irish Confederation 220+20.300.14661N/A

Voting summary

Popular vote
Whig
53.75%
Conservative
42.59%
Irish Repeal
2.93%
Chartist
0.59%
Others
0.14%

Seats summary

Parliamentary seats
Whig
44.51%
Conservative
49.54%
Irish Repeal
5.49%
Chartist
0.15%
Others
0.3%

Regional results

Great Britain

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Conservative & Liberal Conservatives 373180285194,22343.1
Whig 360125267253,37656.2
Chartist 901+12,8480.6
Total742305553Equals-sign-blue.gif450,447100
England
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Conservative & Liberal Conservatives 319149239170,40742.1
Whig 29792222230,65657.2
Chartist 901+12,8480.7
Total625241462Equals-sign-blue.gif403,911100
Scotland
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Whig 482133+220,09281.7+20.9
Conservative & Liberal Conservatives 23162023,50918.320.0
Total713753Equals-sign-blue.gif23,601100
Wales
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Conservative & Liberal Conservatives 22152011,11489.5
Whig 1312121,39410.5
Total352732Equals-sign-blue.gif12,508100

Ireland

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Irish Conservative 382429110,29431.06.1
Peelite 119119643.0
Irish Repeal 51183614,12843.6
Whig 3311255,93520.2
Irish Confederate 3026292.0
Independent 1 00320.2
Total1376210331,982100

Universities

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes%% change
Conservative & Liberal Conservatives 906Equals-sign-blue.gif9,19388.2
Whig 200Equals-sign-blue.gif1,23411.8
Total1106Equals-sign-blue.gif10,427100

Notes

  1. Including Peelites.
  2. Conservative totals include Liberal Conservatives.

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