2010 United Kingdom local elections

Last updated

2010 United Kingdom local elections
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
  2009 6 May 2010 2011  

170 English Local Authorities
 First partySecond partyThird party
  David Cameron - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2010.jpg Gordon Brown (2008).jpg Nick Clegg by the 2009 budget cropped.jpg
Leader David Cameron Gordon Brown Nick Clegg
Party Conservative Labour Liberal Democrats
Leader since6 December 200524 June 200718 December 2007
Percentage35%27%26%
SwingDecrease2.svg4%Increase2.svg1%Increase2.svg1%
Councils663714
Councils +/–Decrease2.svg4Increase2.svg17Decrease2.svg4
Councillors3,4622,9761,730
Councillors +/–Decrease2.svg121Increase2.svg417Decrease2.svg132

United Kingdom local elections, 2010.svg
Colours denote the winning party, as shown in the main table of results.

The 2010 United Kingdom local elections were held on Thursday 6 May 2010, concurrently with the 2010 general election. [1] Direct elections were held to all 32 London boroughs, all 36 metropolitan boroughs, 76 second-tier district authorities, 20 unitary authorities and various Mayoral posts, all in England. For those authorities elected "all out" these were the first elections since 2006. The results provided some comfort to the Labour Party,[ citation needed ] losing the general election on the same day, as it was the first time Conservative councillor numbers declined since 1996.[ citation needed ]

Contents

Summary of results

PartyCouncillorsCouncils
NumberChangeNumberChange
Conservative 3,462Decrease2.svg12166Decrease2.svg4
Labour 2,976Increase2.svg41737Increase2.svg17
Liberal Democrats 1,730Decrease2.svg13214Decrease2.svg4
Residents63Steady2.svg0Steady2.svg
Green 36Decrease2.svg80Steady2.svg
BNP 19Decrease2.svg270Steady2.svg
Liberal 15Decrease2.svg10Steady2.svg
UKIP 9Decrease2.svg40Steady2.svg
Others298Decrease2.svg1170Steady2.svg
No overall controln/an/a47Decrease2.svg7

Source:

London boroughs

Mapped results for London Boroughs Greater London UK district local election 2010 map.svg
Mapped results for London Boroughs

All seats in the 32 London Boroughs were up for election.

CouncilPrevious controlResultDetails
Barking and Dagenham Labour Labour hold Details
Barnet Conservative Conservative hold Details
Bexley Conservative Conservative hold Details
Brent No overall control Labour gain Details
Bromley Conservative Conservative hold Details
Camden No overall control Labour gain Details
Croydon Conservative Conservative hold Details
Ealing Conservative Labour gain Details
Enfield Conservative Labour gain Details
Greenwich Labour Labour hold Details
Hackney Labour Labour hold Details
Hammersmith and Fulham Conservative Conservative hold Details
Haringey Labour Labour hold Details
Harrow Conservative Labour gain Details
Havering Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hillingdon Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hounslow No overall control Labour gain Details
Islington No overall control Labour gain Details
Kensington and Chelsea Conservative Conservative hold Details
Kingston upon Thames Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats hold Details
Lambeth Labour Labour hold Details
Lewisham No overall control Labour gain Details
Merton No overall control No overall control hold Details
Newham Labour Labour hold Details
Redbridge No overall control No overall control hold Details
Richmond upon Thames Liberal Democrats Conservative gain Details
Southwark No overall control Labour gain Details
Sutton Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats hold Details
Tower Hamlets Labour Labour hold Details
Waltham Forest No overall control Labour gain Details
Wandsworth Conservative Conservative hold Details
Westminster Conservative Conservative hold Details

Metropolitan boroughs

Map showing results for the 32 London Boroughs, 36 Metropolitan Boroughs and 20 unitary authorities where seats were contested. United Kingdom local elections, 2010.svg
Map showing results for the 32 London Boroughs, 36 Metropolitan Boroughs and 20 unitary authorities where seats were contested.

One third of the seats in all 36 Metropolitan Boroughs were up for election.

CouncilPrevious controlResultDetails
Barnsley Labour Labour hold Details
Birmingham No overall control No overall control hold Details
Bolton No overall control No overall control hold Details
Bradford No overall control No overall control hold Details
Bury Conservative No overall control gain Details
Calderdale No overall control No overall control hold Details
Coventry No overall control Labour gain Details
Doncaster No overall control Labour gain Details
Dudley Conservative Conservative hold Details
Gateshead Labour Labour hold Details
Kirklees No overall control No overall control hold Details
Knowsley Labour Labour hold Details
Leeds No overall control No overall control hold Details
Liverpool Liberal Democrats Labour gain Details
Manchester Labour Labour hold Details
Newcastle upon Tyne Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats hold Details
North Tyneside Conservative No overall control gain Details
Oldham No overall control No overall control hold Details
Rochdale Liberal Democrats No overall control gain Details
Rotherham Labour Labour hold Details
St. Helens No overall control Labour gain Details
Salford Labour Labour hold Details
Sandwell Labour Labour hold Details
Sefton No overall control No overall control hold Details
Sheffield Liberal Democrats No overall control gain Details
Solihull Conservative No overall control gain Details
South Tyneside Labour Labour hold Details
Stockport Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats hold Details
Sunderland Labour Labour hold Details
Tameside Labour Labour hold Details
Trafford Conservative Conservative hold Details
Wakefield Labour Labour hold Details
Walsall Conservative Conservative hold Details
Wigan Labour Labour hold Details
Wirral No overall control No overall control hold Details
Wolverhampton No overall control No overall control hold Details

Unitary authorities

One third of the council seats were up for election in 20 unitary authorities.

CouncilPrevious controlNew ControlDetails
Blackburn with Darwen No overall control No overall control Details
Bristol Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Derby No overall control No overall control Details
Halton Labour Labour Details
Hartlepool No overall control Labour Details
Kingston upon Hull Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Milton Keynes No overall control No overall control Details
North East Lincolnshire No overall control No overall control Details
Peterborough Conservative Conservative Details
Plymouth Conservative Conservative Details
Portsmouth No overall control Liberal Democrats Details
Reading No overall control No overall control Details
Slough Labour Labour Details
Southampton Conservative Conservative Details
Southend-on-Sea Conservative Conservative Details
Stoke-on-Trent No overall control No overall control Details
Swindon Conservative Conservative Details
Thurrock No overall control No overall control Details
Warrington No overall control No overall control Details
Wokingham Conservative Conservative Details

The elections in Stoke-on-Trent had originally been cancelled following a referendum result which decided to abolish the existing Mayor and Cabinet system of governance, with replacement elections to take place in 2011 following a review of the council by the Boundary Committee for England. [2] However, it was later decided to hold elections to one-third of the council in 2010 as planned. [3]

Non-metropolitan districts

The elections that were due to be held in Exeter and Norwich were cancelled due to structural changes. [4] [5] After the 2010 general election, the structural changes were cancelled, leading to elections in both cities in September 2010 (see 2010 Exeter City Council election and 2010 Norwich City Council election).

Half of council

Seven district councils had half of their seats up for election.

CouncilPrevious controlNew ControlDetails
Adur Conservative Conservative Details
Cheltenham No overall control Liberal Democrats Details
Fareham Conservative Conservative Details
Gosport No overall control Conservative Details
Hastings No overall control Labour Details
Nuneaton and Bedworth Conservative No overall control Details
Oxford No overall control Labour Details

Third of council

69 district councils had one third of their seats up for election.

CouncilPrevious controlNew ControlDetails
Amber Valley Conservative Conservative Details
Barrow-in-Furness No overall control No overall control Details
Basildon Conservative Conservative Details
Basingstoke and Deane Conservative Conservative Details
Bassetlaw Conservative Conservative Details
Brentwood Conservative Conservative Details
Broxbourne Conservative Conservative Details
Burnley Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Cambridge Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Cannock Chase No overall control No overall control Details
City of Carlisle No overall control No overall control Details
Castle Point Conservative Conservative Details
Cherwell Conservative Conservative Details
Chorley Conservative Conservative Details
Colchester No overall control No overall control Details
Craven No overall control Conservative Details
Crawley Conservative Conservative Details
Daventry Conservative Conservative Details
Eastleigh Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Elmbridge Conservative Conservative Details
Epping Forest Conservative Conservative Details
Gloucester No overall control No overall control Details
Great Yarmouth Conservative Conservative Details
Harlow Conservative Conservative Details
Harrogate No overall control Conservative Details
Hart No overall control Conservative Details
Havant Conservative Conservative Details
Hertsmere Conservative Conservative Details
Huntingdonshire Conservative Conservative Details
Hyndburn Conservative No overall control Details
Ipswich No overall control No overall control Details
Lincoln Conservative No overall control Details
Maidstone Conservative Conservative Details
Mole Valley Conservative No overall control Details
Newcastle-under-Lyme No overall control No overall control Details
North Hertfordshire Conservative Conservative Details
Pendle No overall control No overall control Details
Preston No overall control No overall control Details
Purbeck No overall control No overall control Details
Redditch Conservative Conservative Details
Reigate and Banstead Conservative Conservative Details
Rochford Conservative Conservative Details
Rossendale Conservative Conservative Details
Rugby Conservative Conservative Details
Runnymede Conservative Conservative Details
Rushmoor Conservative Conservative Details
St Albans Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
South Cambridgeshire Conservative Conservative Details
South Lakeland Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Stevenage Labour Labour Details
Stratford-on-Avon Conservative Conservative Details
Stroud Conservative Conservative Details
Swale Conservative Conservative Details
Tamworth Conservative Conservative Details
Tandridge Conservative Conservative Details
Three Rivers Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Tunbridge Wells Conservative Conservative Details
Watford Liberal Democrats Liberal Democrats Details
Waveney Conservative Conservative Details
Welwyn Hatfield Conservative Conservative Details
West Lancashire Conservative Conservative Details
West Lindsey Conservative Conservative Details
West Oxfordshire Conservative Conservative Details
Weymouth and Portland No overall control No overall control Details
Winchester Conservative Liberal Democrats Details
Woking Conservative No overall control Details
Worcester No overall control No overall control Details
Worthing Conservative Conservative Details
Wyre Forest Conservative Conservative Details

Mayoral elections

There were four mayoral elections.

Local AuthorityPrevious MayorNew MayorDetails
Hackney Jules Pipe (Labour) Jules Pipe (Labour) Details
Lewisham Sir Steve Bullock (Labour) Sir Steve Bullock (Labour) Details
Newham Sir Robin Wales (Labour) Sir Robin Wales (Labour) Details
Watford Dorothy Thornhill (Liberal Democrat) Dorothy Thornhill (Liberal Democrat) Details

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References

  1. Siddique, Haroon (6 April 2010). "Gordon Brown confirms 6 May general election date". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 6 April 2010.
  2. "Strengthening local leadership and improving services in Stoke-on-Trent". Ministry of Communities and Local Government. 8 May 2009. Archived from the original on 9 June 2009. Retrieved 13 July 2009.
  3. "Notice of Election - City of Stoke on Trent". Stoke on Trent City Council. 10 April 2010. Archived from the original on 25 April 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  4. "The Norwich and Norfolk (Structural Changes) Order 2010 No. 997". Legislation.gov.uk. Office of Public Sector Information. 24 March 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  5. "The Exeter and Devon (Structural Changes) Order 2010 No. 998". Office of Public Sector Information. 24 March 2010. Archived from the original on 16 August 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2010.