Non-metropolitan district

Last updated

Non-metropolitan district
  • Also known as:
  • Shire district
English non-metropolitan districts map 2021.svg
Category Local authority districts
LocationEngland
Found in Non-metropolitan county
Created by Local Government Act 1972
Created
  • 1 April 1974
Number239 (as of 2021)
Possible types
Possible status

Non-metropolitan districts, or colloquially "shire districts", are a type of local government district in England. As created, they are sub-divisions of non-metropolitan counties (colloquially shire counties) in a two-tier arrangement. Non-metropolitan districts with borough status are known as boroughs, able to appoint a mayor and refer to itself as a borough council.

Contents

Non-metropolitan districts

Non-metropolitan districts are subdivisions of English non-metropolitan counties which have a two-tier structure of local government. [1] Most non-metropolitan counties have a county council and several districts, each with a borough or district council. In these cases local government functions are divided between county and district councils, to the level where they can be practised most efficiently:

Service Non-metropolitan county Non-metropolitan district Unitary authority
EducationYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
HousingYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Planning applicationsYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Strategic planningYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Transport planningYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Passenger transportYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
HighwaysYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
FireYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Social servicesYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
LibrariesYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Leisure and recreationYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Waste collectionYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Waste disposalYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Environmental healthYes check.svgYYes check.svgY
Revenue collectionYes check.svgYYes check.svgY

Status

Many districts have borough status, which means the local council is called a borough council instead of district council and gives them the right to appoint a mayor. Borough status is granted by royal charter and, in many cases, continues a style enjoyed by a predecessor authority, which can date back centuries. Some districts such as Oxford or Exeter have city status, granted by letters patent, but this does not give the local council any extra powers other than the right to call itself a city council. Not all city or borough councils are non-metropolitan districts, many being unitary authorities – districts which are ceremonially part of a non-metropolitan county, but not run by the county council – or metropolitan districts – which are subdivisions of the metropolitan counties created in 1974, but whose county councils were abolished in 1986 and are effectively unitary authorities with similar powers.

History

By 1899, England had been divided at district level into rural districts, urban districts, municipal boroughs, county boroughs and metropolitan boroughs. This system was abolished by the London Government Act 1963 and the Local Government Act 1972. Non-metropolitan districts were created by this act in 1974 when England outside Greater London was divided into metropolitan counties and non-metropolitan counties. Metropolitan counties were sub-divided into metropolitan districts and the non-metropolitan counties were sub-divided into non-metropolitan districts. The metropolitan districts had more powers than their non-metropolitan counterparts. Initially, there were 296 non-metropolitan districts in the two-tier structure, but reforms in the 1990s and 2009 reduced their number to 192. A further 55 non-metropolitan districts are now unitary authorities, which combine the functions of county and borough/district councils.

Scotland and Wales

In Wales, an almost identical two-tier system of local government existed between 1974 and 1996 (see Districts of Wales). In 1996, this was abolished and replaced with an entirely unitary system of local government, with one level of local government responsible for all local services. Since the areas for Wales and England had been enacted separately and there were no Welsh metropolitan areas, the term 'non-metropolitan district' does not apply to Wales. A similar system existed in Scotland, which in 1975 was divided into regions and districts, this was also abolished in 1996 and replaced with a fully unitary system.

District Councils' Network

In England 200 out of the 201 non-metropolitan district councils are represented by the District Councils' Network, [2] special interest group which sits within the Local Government Association. [3] The network's purpose is to "act as an informed and representative advocate for districts to government and other national bodies, based on their unique position to deliver for ‘local’ people.”

List of counties and districts

This is a list of two-tier non-metropolitan counties and their districts. All unitary authorities are non-metropolitan districts, which, with the exception of those of Berkshire, are coterminous with non-metropolitan counties.

For a full list of districts of all types including unitary authorities, metropolitan districts and London boroughs, see Districts of England.

Non-metropolitan county
(excluding unitary authorities)
Non-metropolitan districts
(excluding unitary authorities)
Number
Cambridgeshire CambridgeSouth CambridgeshireHuntingdonshireFenlandEast Cambridgeshire 5
Cumbria Barrow-in-FurnessSouth LakelandCopelandAllerdaleEdenCarlisle 6
Derbyshire High PeakDerbyshire DalesSouth DerbyshireErewashAmber ValleyNorth East DerbyshireChesterfieldBolsover 8
Devon ExeterEast DevonMid DevonNorth DevonTorridgeWest DevonSouth HamsTeignbridge 8
East Sussex HastingsRotherWealdenEastbourneLewes 5
Essex HarlowEpping ForestBrentwoodBasildonCastle PointRochfordMaldonChelmsfordUttlesfordBraintreeColchesterTendring 12
Gloucestershire GloucesterTewkesburyCheltenhamCotswoldStroudForest of Dean 6
Hampshire GosportFarehamWinchesterHavantEast HampshireHartRushmoorBasingstoke and DeaneTest ValleyEastleighNew Forest 11
Hertfordshire Three RiversWatfordHertsmereWelwyn HatfieldBroxbourneEast HertfordshireStevenageNorth HertfordshireSt AlbansDacorum 10
Kent DartfordGraveshamSevenoaksTonbridge and MallingTunbridge WellsMaidstoneSwaleAshfordFolkestone and HytheCanterburyDoverThanet 12
Lancashire West LancashireChorleySouth RibbleFyldePrestonWyreLancasterRibble ValleyPendleBurnleyRossendaleHyndburn 12
Leicestershire CharnwoodMeltonHarboroughOadby and WigstonBlabyHinckley and BosworthNorth West Leicestershire 7
Lincolnshire LincolnNorth KestevenSouth KestevenSouth HollandBostonEast LindseyWest Lindsey 7
Norfolk NorwichSouth NorfolkGreat YarmouthBroadlandNorth NorfolkKing's Lynn and West NorfolkBreckland 7
North Yorkshire SelbyHarrogateCravenRichmondshireHambletonRyedaleScarborough 7
Nottinghamshire RushcliffeBroxtoweAshfieldGedlingNewark and SherwoodMansfieldBassetlaw 7
Oxfordshire OxfordCherwellSouth OxfordshireVale of White HorseWest Oxfordshire 5
Somerset South SomersetSomerset West and TauntonSedgemoorMendip 4
Staffordshire TamworthLichfieldCannock ChaseSouth StaffordshireStaffordNewcastle-under-LymeStaffordshire MoorlandsEast Staffordshire 8
Suffolk IpswichBaberghEast SuffolkMid SuffolkWest Suffolk 5
Surrey SpelthorneRunnymedeSurrey HeathWokingElmbridgeGuildfordWaverleyMole ValleyEpsom and EwellReigate and BansteadTandridge 11
Warwickshire North WarwickshireNuneaton and BedworthRugbyStratford-on-AvonWarwick 5
West Sussex WorthingArunChichesterHorshamCrawleyMid SussexAdur 7
Worcestershire WorcesterMalvern HillsWyre ForestBromsgroveRedditchWychavon 6
Total181

List of abolished non-metropolitan districts

This is a list of former two-tier districts in England which have been abolished, by local government reorganisations such as the 2009 structural changes to local government in England. It does not include districts that still exist after becoming a unitary authority or those that transferred from one county to another, including those that changed name. Nor does it include unitary authorities that have been abolished (Bournemouth and Poole).

Non-metropolitan county (at time of abolition)Abolished non-metropolitan districtsNumber
Avon BathKingswoodNorthavonWansdyke 4
Bedfordshire Mid BedfordshireSouth Bedfordshire 2
Buckinghamshire South BucksChilternWycombeAylesbury Vale 4
Cheshire ChesterCongletonCrewe and NantwichEllesmere Port and NestonMacclesfieldVale Royal 6
Cornwall CaradonCarrickKerrierNorth CornwallPenwithRestormel 6
Dorset Weymouth and PortlandWest DorsetNorth DorsetPurbeckEast DorsetChristchurch 6
Durham DurhamEasingtonSedgefieldChester-le-StreetDerwentsideWear ValleyTeesdale 7
East Sussex BrightonHove 2
Hereford and Worcester HerefordLeominsterSouth Herefordshire 3
Humberside BeverleyBoothferryCleethorpesEast YorkshireGlanfordGreat GrimsbyHoldernessScunthorpe 8
Isle of Wight MedinaSouth Wight 2
Kent GillinghamRochester-upon-Medway 2
Northamptonshire South NorthamptonshireNorthamptonDaventryWellingboroughKetteringCorbyEast Northamptonshire 7
North Yorkshire York [lower-alpha 1] 1
Northumberland Blyth ValleyWansbeckCastle MorpethTynedaleAlnwickBerwick-upon-Tweed 6
Shropshire BridgnorthNorth ShropshireOswestryShrewsbury and AtchamSouth Shropshire 5
Somerset Taunton DeaneWest Somerset 2
Suffolk Forest HeathSt EdmundsburySuffolk CoastalWaveney 4
Wiltshire KennetNorth WiltshireSalisburyWest Wiltshire 4
Total81

See also

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References

  1. National Statistics – Counties, Non-metropolitan Districts and Unitary Authorities Archived 9 May 2002 at the UK Government Web Archive
  2. "Members | District Councils' Network". Districtcouncils.info. Retrieved 24 September 2013.
  3. "Special interest groups | Local Government Association". Government of the United Kingdom. 30 August 2013. Retrieved 24 September 2013.
  1. the district was abolished in 1996 and merged to form a larger York unitary district