Metropolitan borough

Last updated

Metropolitan district
  • Also known as:
  • Metropolitan borough
English metropolitan boroughs map 2021.svg
Category Local authority districts
Location England
Found in Metropolitan county
Created by Local Government Act 1972
Created
  • 1 April 1974
Number36 (as of 2008)
Possible status
  • City
Additional status
  • Borough
Populations0.1 - 1.1 million

A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England. Created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972, metropolitan boroughs are defined in English law as metropolitan districts within metropolitan counties. All of the metropolitan districts have been granted or regranted royal charters giving them borough status (and in some cases, they also have city status). [1] Metropolitan boroughs have been effectively unitary authority areas since the abolition of metropolitan county councils by the Local Government Act 1985. [2] Metropolitan boroughs pool much of their authority in joint boards and other arrangements that cover whole metropolitan counties, such as city regions or combined authorities, with most of the latter having a metro mayor.

Contents

History

London metropolitan boroughs (1900–1965)

The term "metropolitan borough" was first used for administrative subdivisions of the County of London between 1900 and 1965. There were 28 of these metropolitan boroughs, which were replaced by a new system of larger London boroughs in 1965, when the County of London was replaced by Greater London.

Current metropolitan boroughs

The current metropolitan boroughs originated as metropolitan districts created in 1974 as subdivisions of new metropolitan counties, created to cover the six largest urban areas in England outside Greater London. The new districts replaced the previous system of county boroughs, municipal boroughs, and urban and rural districts.

Metropolitan districts were originally parts of a two-tier structure of local government, and shared power with metropolitan county councils. They differed from non-metropolitan districts in the division of powers between district and county councils. Metropolitan districts were local education authorities, and were also responsible for social services and libraries. In non-metropolitan counties these services were (and are) the responsibility of county councils. [3]

Many metropolitan districts were boroughs from their establishment on 1 April 1974; others gained borough status later.

In 1986 the metropolitan county councils were abolished under the Local Government Act 1985 and most of their functions were devolved to the metropolitan boroughs, making them, to a large extent, unitary authorities in all but name. At the same time some of the functions of the abolished metropolitan county councils were taken over by joint bodies such as passenger transport authorities, and joint fire, police and waste disposal authorities. [2]

Metropolitan district councils

The metropolitan districts are administered by metropolitan district councils. They are the principal local authorities in the six metropolitan counties and are responsible for running most local services, such as schools, social services, waste collection, and roads. [ citation needed ]

The 36 metropolitan boroughs are:

Metropolitan countyMetropolitan districtsNumberCounty population[ citation needed ]
Merseyside Liverpool, Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton, Wirral 51,365,000
Greater Manchester Manchester, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan 102,573,200
South Yorkshire Sheffield, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham 41,290,000
Tyne and Wear Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, South Tyneside, North Tyneside, Sunderland 51,299,000
West Midlands Birmingham, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull, Walsall, Wolverhampton 72,916,458
West Yorkshire Leeds, Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Wakefield 52,161,200

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Local Government Act 1972, Schedule I, Part I, Metropolitan Counties and Metropolitan Districts
  2. 1 2 Local Government Act 1985 c.51
  3. Local Government in England and Wales: A Guide to the New System. London: HMSO. 1974. p. 7. ISBN   0-11-750847-0.