Division (political geography)

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A division is a type of administrative division of some Asian and African countries, as well as a sub-division of entities in England. Some have been dissolved or been renamed.

Administrative divisions

GroupContinentLevelNote
Divisions of Bangladesh Asia1stafter Districts of Bangladesh
Divisions of Cameroon (also called departments)Africa2ndbelow provinces of Cameroon
Divisions of Fiji Oceania1st
Divisions of the Gambia Africa1strenamed to regions
Divisions of India Asia2ndbelow states of India
Divisions of Malaysia Asia2ndin two of the states of Malaysia: Sabah and Sarawak
Divisions of Myanmar Asia1strenamed to regions, per 2008 Constitution
Divisions of Pakistan Asia2ndbelow Provinces of Pakistan dissolved in 2000, re-established between 2008 and 2011

England

Some of the hundreds and wapentakes in England (of the historic counties of England) were divided into divisions. Also a number of the Wards of the City of London are, or were, divided into two divisions.


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