Banner (administrative division)

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Banner is a type of administrative division, and may more specifically refer to:

Contents

China

Anatolia

Arab world

See also

Notes and references

  1. Grousset, René (1970). The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p.  530. ISBN   978-0-8135-0627-2.
  2. Elliott, Mark C. (2001). The Manchu way: the eight banners and ethnic identity in late imperial China. Palo Alto, California: Stanford University Press. ISBN   978-0-8047-4684-7.
  3. Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991). "Bandon". The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium . Oxford University Press. p. 250. ISBN   978-0-19-504652-6.

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