Administrative county

Last updated
Administrative county
CategoryCounty
Location England and Wales and Ireland
Created by Local Government Act 1888
Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
Created England and Wales 1889
Ireland 1899
Abolished by Local Government (Boundaries) Act (Northern Ireland) 1971
Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 2001
Abolished Northern Ireland 1973
England and Wales 1974
Republic of Ireland 2002
GovernmentCounty council
Subdivisions Rural district
Urban district
Municipal borough

An administrative county was a first-level administrative division in England and Wales from 1888 to 1974, and in Ireland from 1899 until either 1973 (in Northern Ireland) or 2002 (in the Republic of Ireland). They are now abolished, although most Northern Ireland lieutenancy areas and Republic of Ireland counties have the same boundaries as former administrative countries.

Contents

History

England and Wales

The term was introduced for England and Wales by the Local Government Act 1888, which created county councils for various areas, and called them 'administrative counties' to distinguish them from the continuing statutory counties.

In England and Wales the legislation was repealed in 1974, and entities called 'metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties' in England and 'counties' in Wales were introduced in their place. Though strictly inaccurate, these are often called 'administrative counties' to distinguish them from both the historic counties, and the ceremonial counties.

Scotland

In Scotland they were never established as separate entities as they were in England and Wales[ citation needed ]. For local government purposes Scottish counties were replaced in 1975 with a system of regions and island council areas.

Ireland

The Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898 created administrative counties in Ireland on the same model that had been used in England and Wales.

In Northern Ireland the administrative counties were replaced by a system of 26 districts on 1 October 1973. Section 131 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972 stated that "every county and every county borough shall cease to be an administrative area for local government purposes". [1]

The areas of the former administrative counties (and county boroughs) remain in use for Lieutenancy purposes, being defined as the areas used "for local government purposes immediately before 1 October 1973, subject to any subsequent definition of their boundaries...". [2]

In the Republic of Ireland the legislation that created them remained in force until the Local Government Act 2001 was passed, which renamed them 'counties'.

New entities

England - administrative counties 1890-1965. England Admin Counties 1890-1965.png
England – administrative counties 1890–1965.

The administrative counties that did not share the names of previous counties:

England

CountyAdministrative counties
Cambridgeshire Isle of Ely
Hampshire Isle of Wight
Lincolnshire Holland, Kesteven, Lindsey
London London
Northamptonshire Soke of Peterborough
Suffolk East Suffolk, West Suffolk
Sussex East Sussex, West Sussex
Yorkshire East Riding, North Riding, West Riding

Scotland

Republic of Ireland

See also

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References

  1. Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972, (1972 C.9)
  2. The Northern Ireland (Lieutenancy) Order 1975 (S.I. 1975 No.156)