Autonomous province

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Autonomous province is a term for a type of province that has administrative autonomy. [1] In political history, the term has been used as designation for various types of autonomous entities, on medium levels of administrative hierarchy. In relative terms, an autonomous province usually has less autonomy than an autonomous state , but more autonomy than an autonomous region . Administrative autonomy of a province can be expressed in its official name, by the use of a particular term designating the autonomy, but such term can also be omitted. In that case, the autonomous status of a province can be determined on the basis of relevant legal provisions.

Contents

Occurrences

Italian autonomous provinces of Trentino and South Tyrol Trentino-South Tyrol Provinces.png
Italian autonomous provinces of Trentino and South Tyrol

Finland

In Finland, there is one autonomous province:

Italy

In Italy, there are two autonomous provinces:

Serbia

In Serbia, there are two autonomous provinces:

Former autonomous provinces

See also

Literature

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References

  1. Collins Dictionary, accessed 4 Feb 2020