1837 United Kingdom general election

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1837 United Kingdom general election
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
  1835 24 July – 18 August 1837 (1837-07-24 1837-08-18) 1841  

All 658 seats in the House of Commons
330 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond party
  William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, painted by John Partridge.jpg Robert Peel by RR Scanlan detail.jpg
Leader Viscount Melbourne Sir Robert Peel
Party Whig Conservative
Leader since16 July 183419 December 1834
Leader's seat House of Lords Tamworth
Last election385 seats, 57.2%273 seats, 42.8%
Seats won344 [lower-alpha 1] 314
Seat changeDecrease2.svg41Increase2.svg41
Popular vote418,331379,694
Percentage52.4%47.6%
SwingDecrease2.svg4.8%Increase2.svg4.8%

United Kingdom general election 1837.svg
Colours denote the winning party

1837 UK GE Composition diagram.svg
Composition of the House of Commons after the election

Prime Minister before election

Viscount Melbourne
Whig

Prime Minister after
election

Viscount Melbourne
Whig

The 1837 United Kingdom general election was triggered by the death of King William IV and produced the first Parliament of the reign of his successor, Queen Victoria. It saw Robert Peel's Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their fourth election of the decade.

Contents

The election marked the last time that a Parliament was dissolved as a result of the demise of the Crown. The dissolution of Parliament six months after a demise of the Crown, as provided for by the Succession to the Crown Act 1707, was abolished by the Reform Act 1867.

Results

1837 UK parliament.svg
UK General Election 1837
PartyCandidatesVotes
StoodElectedGainedUnseatedNet % of total %No.Net %
  Whig 510344 [lower-alpha 1] 4152.2852.42418,3314.8
  Conservative 484314+4147.7247.58379,694+4.8

Voting summary

Popular vote
Whig
52.42%
Conservative
47.58%

Seats summary

Parliamentary seats
Whig
52.28%
Conservative
47.72%

Regional results

Great Britain

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Conservative 414102284+46353,00048.2+5.4
Whig 4228127146379,96151.85.4
Total836183555Steady3.svg732,961100
England
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Conservative 34880239+39321,12448.9+6.3
Whig 3526022539347,54951.16.3
Total658177464Steady3.svg491,540100
Scotland
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Whig 491533522,08254.08.8
Conservative 35720+518,56946.0+8.8
Total842253Steady3.svg40,651100
Wales
PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Conservative 251119+211,61652.811.1
Whig 20613210,14447.2+11.1
Total451732Steady3.svg21,760100

Ireland

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Whig/Repeal Coalition 883473+538,37058.5+9.9
Irish Conservative 701930526,69441.59.9
Total1585310365,064100

Universities

PartyCandidatesUnopposedSeatsSeats changeVotes % % change
Conservative 646Steady3.svg1,69190.1
Whig 100Steady3.svg1869.9
Total666Steady3.svg1,877100

Notes

  1. 1 2 The seat and vote count figures for the Whigs given here include the Speaker of the House of Commons

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References