1989 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom

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1989 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
  1984 15 June 1989 1994  

81 seats to the European Parliament
Turnout36.4% (Increase2.svg3.8%)
 First partySecond party
 
Lab
Con
Leader Barry Seal Christopher Prout
Party Labour Conservative
Alliance PES EPP
Leader's seat Yorkshire West Shropshire and Stafford
Last election32 seats, 34.8%45 seats, 38.8%
Seats won4532
Seat changeIncrease2.svg13Decrease2.svg13
Popular vote6,153,6405,331,077
Percentage38.7%33.7%
SwingIncrease2.svg3.9%Decrease2.svg5.1%

European Parliament election, 1989 (United Kingdom).svg
Colours denote the winning party, as shown in the main table of results.

1989 UK European Parliament election.svg

Leader of Largest Party before election

Margaret Thatcher
Conservative

Subsequent Leader of Largest Party

Neil Kinnock
Labour

The European Parliament Election, 1989, was the third European election to be held in the United Kingdom. It was held on 15 June. The electoral system was First Past the Post in England, Scotland and Wales and Single Transferable Vote in Northern Ireland. The turnout was again the lowest in Europe.

Contents

This election saw the best performance ever by the Green Party (UK) (formerly the Ecology Party), collecting over 2 million votes and 15% of the vote share. It had only received 70,853 as the Ecology Party in the previous election. However, because of First Past the Post system, the Green Party did not gain a single MEP, while the Scottish National Party received 1 seat with only 3% of the vote share. The Green Party's vote total of 2,299,287 remains its best performance in a national election, as does its percentage result of 14.5%.

The election also saw Labour overtake the Conservatives for the first time in any election since October 1974 and the first time ever in a European election, winning 13 more seats.

Results

United Kingdom

PartyVotes won [1]  % of voteLoss/GainSeats % of seatsLoss/Gain
Labour 6,153,66138.7Increase2.svg3.94555.6Increase2.svg13
Conservative 5,356,88733.7Decrease2.svg5.13239.5Decrease2.svg13
Green 2,299,28714.5Increase2.svg14.00Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SLD 944,8615.9Decrease2.svg12.60Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SNP 406,6862.6Increase2.svg1.011.2Steady2.svg
DUP 160,1101.0Decrease2.svg0.611.2Steady2.svg
SDLP 136,3350.9Decrease2.svg0.211.2Steady2.svg
UUP 118,7850.7Decrease2.svg0.411.2Steady2.svg
Plaid Cymru 115,0620.7Decrease2.svg0.10Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SDP 75,8860.5New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Sinn Féin 48,9140.3Decrease2.svg0.40Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Alliance 27,9050.2Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Independent 12,7240.1Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Ind. Conservative 6,9960.0Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Workers' Party 5,5900.0Decrease2.svg0.10Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Labour Representation Group3,5400.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Communist 4,4200.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Monster Raving Loony 4,2630.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Mebyon Kernow 4,2240.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Wessex Regionalist 2,3320.0Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
International Communist 1,5670.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
National Front 1,4710.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Humanist 1,3490.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Labour Party NI 1,2740.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Socialist (GB) 9190.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Corrective 7070.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Communist League 3230.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg

Great Britain

PartyVotes won [1]  % of voteLoss/GainSeats % of seatsLoss/Gain
Labour 6,153,66140.1Increase2.svg3.64557.7Increase2.svg13
Conservative 5,331,09834.7Decrease2.svg6.13241.0Decrease2.svg13
Green 2,292,71814.9Increase2.svg14.40Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SLD 944,8616.2Decrease2.svg13.30Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SNP 406,6862.6Increase2.svg0.911.3Steady2.svg
Plaid Cymru 115,0620.7Decrease2.svg0.10Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
SDP 75,8860.5New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Independent 12,7240.1Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Ind. Conservative 6,9960.0Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Communist 4,4200.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Monster Raving Loony 4,2630.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Mebyon Kernow 4,2240.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Wessex Regionalist 2,3320.0Steady2.svg0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
International Communist 1,5670.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
National Front 1,4710.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Humanist 1,3490.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Socialist (GB) 9190.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Corrective 7070.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg
Communist League 3230.0New0Steady2.svgSteady2.svg

Total votes cast: 15,361,267

Northern Ireland

PartyCandidate(s)SeatsLoss/GainFirst Preference Votes [2]
Number % of vote
DUP Ian Paisley 10160,11029.9
SDLP John Hume 10136,33525.5
UUP Jim Nicholson 10118,78522.2
Sinn Féin Danny Morrison 0048,9149.1
Alliance John Alderdice 0027,9055.2
NI Conservatives Myrtle Boal0025,7894.8
Green Malcolm Samuel006,5691.0
Workers' Party Seamus Lynch005,5901
Labour Representation Mark Langhammer 003,5400
Labour '87 Brian Caul001,2740

Total votes cast – 534,811.

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References

  1. 1 2 "European Parliament elections: 1979 to 1994". House of Commons Library.
  2. http://www.parliament.uk/briefing-papersRP99-57.pdf