European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999

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European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999
Act of Parliament
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Long title An Act to amend the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1978 so as to alter the method used in Great Britain for electing Members of the European Parliament to make other amendments of enactments relating to the election of Members of the European Parliament and for connected purposes.
Citation 1999 c.1
Introduced by Jack Straw [1]
Territorial extentUnited Kingdom
Dates
Royal assent 14 January 1999
Repealed24 August 2002
Other legislation
Repeals European Parliamentary Elections Act 1993
Repealed by European Parliamentary Elections Act 2002
Status: Repealed
Text of statute as originally enacted

The European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999 (c.1) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The Act amended the procedures on European elections in the United Kingdom. It received Royal Assent on 14 January 1999, after the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949 had been invoked, as the House of Lords had rejected the bill six times, refusing to accept the change in the electoral system proposed. The Parliament Acts are rarely invoked, the European Parliamentary Elections Act was only the fifth statute since 1911 enacted under their provisions, and only the second since the Parliament Act 1949. [2]

An act of parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature). Act of the Oireachtas is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland where the legislature is commonly known by its Irish name, Oireachtas. It is also comparable to an Act of Congress in the United States.

Parliament of the United Kingdom Supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known internationally as the UK Parliament, British Parliament, or Westminster Parliament, and domestically simply as Parliament, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and the British Overseas Territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and the overseas territories. Parliament is bicameral but has three parts, consisting of the Sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. The two houses meet in the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, one of the inner boroughs of the capital city, London.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

It was passed mainly to change the electoral system used for electing Member of the European Parliament (MEP)s from First Past the Post to a closed party List system in England, Scotland and Wales. The Single Transferable Vote system was retained in Northern Ireland. The UK was divided into twelve electoral regions, nine in England (matching the regions of England) and one in Scotland, one in Wales and one in Northern Ireland. It did not change the number of MEPs elected from the UK.

Member of the European Parliament person who has been elected to the European Parliament

A Member of the European Parliament (MEP) is a person who has been elected to serve as a popular representative in the European Parliament.

Closed list


Closed list describes the variant of party-list proportional representation where voters can (effectively) only vote for political parties as a whole and thus have no influence on the party-supplied order in which party candidates are elected. If voters have at least some influence then it is called an open list.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

The Act led to a great many more MEPs being returned from minor parties in the 1999 European elections, with more Liberal Democrats, along with the first European representatives for Plaid Cymru and the first national representatives for both the Green Party and the United Kingdom Independence Party.

1999 European Parliament election in the United Kingdom

The European Parliament Election, 1999 was the United Kingdom's part of the European Parliament election 1999. It was held on 10 June 1999. Following the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, it was the first European election to be held in the United Kingdom where the whole country used a system of proportional representation. In total, 87 Members of the European Parliament were elected from the United Kingdom.

Liberal Democrats (UK) Political party in the United Kingdom

The Liberal Democrats is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently led by Vince Cable. The party has 11 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons, 96 members of the House of Lords, 16 members of the European Parliament, five Members of the Scottish Parliament and one member in the Welsh Assembly and London Assembly. The party was in a coalition government with the Conservative Party from 2010 to 2015.

Plaid Cymru is a social-democratic political party in Wales advocating Welsh independence from the United Kingdom within the European Union.

See also

European Assembly Elections Act 1978 Assembly of European communities.

The European Assembly Elections Act 1978 also known as the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1978 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that made provision for the holding of elections of representatives to the European Assembly from the United Kingdom. It made provision for the election of 81 "Representatives to the Assembly" (which would later become Members of the European Parliament to the European Assembly with 66 members being elected from England, 8 from Scotland, 4 from Wales using the first past the post electoral system in 78 one member constituencies and 3 members from Northern Ireland using the Single transferable vote in a single constituency. The act also prevented any increase in the powers of the Assembly from being ratified unless approved by a further Act of Parliament. The first elections took place on Thursday 7 June 1979.

European Parliamentary Elections Act 1993

The European Parliamentary Elections Act 1993 is an Act of Parliament that amended the procedures on European elections in the United Kingdom, amending the European Assembly Elections Act 1978. It received the Royal Assent on 5 November 1993.

European Parliamentary Elections Act 2002 2002 Act of Parliament setting up voting process for the European Parliament

The European Parliamentary Elections Act 2002 (c.24) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom governing elections to the European Parliament.

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References

  1. "European Parliamentary Elections". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) . 321. House of Commons. 27 November 1998. col. 437.
  2. "Parliament Acts: Question". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) . 718. House of Lords. 8 April 2010. col. 462-463.