1895 United Kingdom general election

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1895 United Kingdom general election
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
  1892 13 July – 7 August 1895 (1895-07-13 1895-08-07) 1900  

All 670 seats in the House of Commons
336 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond party
  Photo of Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury.jpg The Earl of Rosebery.jpg
Leader Marquess of Salisbury Earl of Rosebery
Party Conservative & Lib. Unionist Liberal
Leader sinceApril 18815 March 1894
Last election313 seats, 47.0%272 seats, 45.4%
Seats won411177
Seat changeIncrease2.svg97Decrease2.svg94
Popular vote1,759,4841,628,405
Percentage49.3%45.6%
SwingIncrease2.svg2.3%Increase2.svg0.2%

 Third partyFourth party
  John Dillon LOC 25678086606.jpg Ireland yesterday and today (1909) (14587063449) (cropped).jpg
Leader John Dillon John Redmond
Party Irish National Federation Irish National League
Leader since18921891
Leader's seat East Mayo Waterford City
Last election72 seats, 5.2%9 seats, 1.6%
Seats won7012
Seat changeDecrease2.svg2Increase2.svg3
Popular vote92,55647,698
Percentage2.6%1.3%
SwingDecrease2.svg2.6%Decrease2.svg0.3%

United Kingdom general election 1895.svg
Colours denote the winning party

Prime Minister before election

Marquess of Salisbury
Conservative

Prime Minister after
election

Marquess of Salisbury
Conservative

The 1895 United Kingdom general election was held from 13 July to 7 August 1895. It was won by the Conservatives led by Lord Salisbury who formed an alliance with the Liberal Unionist Party and had a large majority over the Liberals, led by Lord Rosebery. The Irish Parliamentary Party was split at this time, the majority of its MPs (the "Anti-Parnellites") following John Dillon, while a rump (the "Parnellites") followed John Redmond.

Contents

Results

4111777012
Conservative & Lib. UnionistLiberalINFINL
UK General Election 1895
CandidatesVotes
PartyLeaderStoodElectedGainedUnseatedNet% of total%No.Net %
  Conservative & Lib. Unionist Lord Salisbury 58841111417+9761.3449.251,759,484+2.2
  Liberal Lord Rosebery 447177181129426.4245.581,628,405+0.2
  Irish National Federation John Dillon 7770210.452.5992,5562.6
  Irish National League John Redmond 2612+31.791.3447,6980.2
  Ind. Labour Party Keir Hardie 280000.9634,433N/A
  Independent Liberal N/A30100.103,733
  Social Democratic Federation H. M. Hyndman 40000.093,122+0.1
 Independent Lib-LabN/A20000.072,348
  Independent Labour N/A 1 0300.02608
  Independent N/A2000000.0052

Voting summary

Popular vote
Conservative and Liberal Unionist
49.25%
Liberal
45.58%
Irish National Federation
2.59%
Irish National League
1.34%
Independent Labour Party
0.96%
Others
0.28%

Seats summary

Parliamentary seats
Conservative and Liberal Unionist
61.34%
Liberal
26.42%
Irish National Federation
10.45%
Irish National League
1.79%

See also

Notes

  1. All parties shown.

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References