Holderness (borough)

Last updated
Holderness
Holderness district, Humberside.svg
Holderness shown within Humberside
Area
  1974133,593 acres (540.63 km2) [1]
Population
  1973 [2] 42,610
  1992 [3] 51,800
History
  Created1974
  Abolished1996
  Succeeded by East Riding of Yorkshire
Status Non-metropolitan district,
Borough
Government
   HQ Skirlaugh
   Motto Think Right : Do Right
Holderness arms.png

Holderness was a local government district and borough in northern England, named for the Holderness peninsula.

It was formed on 1 April 1974 along with the non-metropolitan county of Humberside in which it was situated. It was formed from part of the administrative county of Yorkshire, East Riding, namely:

On 1 April 1996, Humberside and the borough were abolished, and it became part of the new unitary East Riding of Yorkshire. [4]

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References

  1. Local government in England and Wales: A Guide to the New System. London: HMSO. 1974. p. 60. ISBN   0-11-750847-0.
  2. Registrar General's annual estimated figure mid 1973
  3. OPCS Key Population and Vital Statistics 1992
  4. "The Humberside (Structural Change) Order 1995". Office of Public Sector Information. 1995. Archived from the original on 14 February 2009. Retrieved 12 January 2009.

Coordinates: 53°47′42″N0°10′19″W / 53.795°N 0.172°W / 53.795; -0.172