Sudbury (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Sudbury
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
1559–1844
Number of memberstwo
Sudbury
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
18851950
Number of membersone
Replaced by Sudbury and Woodbridge
Created from Western Division of Suffolk

Sudbury was a parliamentary constituency which was represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Contents

History

A parliamentary borough consisting of the town of Sudbury in Suffolk, the constituency returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) from 1559 until it was disenfranchised for corruption in 1844, after which it was absorbed into the Western Division of Suffolk. It was probably enfranchised through lobbying from Ambrose Cave the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster who had interests in the area and could influence the choice of MPs. [1] Sudbury had in the eighteenth Century been seen as a particularly expensive seat [2] but not under the influence of any patron [3] and in the 1761 general election Horace Walpole the cousin of the outgoing MP, Thomas Walpole, had claimed that Sudbury had openly advertised itself for sale [4] with the new MP, John Henniker having to spend £5,500 from the Duke of Newcastle's funds. [5] but not under the influence of any patron [6] The Sudbury election of 1835, which Charles Dickens reported for the Morning Chronicle , is thought by many experts to be the inspiration for the famous Eatanswill election in his novel Pickwick Papers . [7]

It was re-established as one of five single-member county divisions of the Parliamentary County of Suffolk by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 for the 1885 general election, electing one MP by the first past the post voting system. It was abolished for the 1950 general election.

Boundaries and boundary changes

1885–1918: The part of the Municipal Borough of Sudbury in the county of Suffolk, the Sessional Divisions of Boxford, Cosford, Melford, and Risbridge, and parts of the Sessional Divisions of Newmarket, and Thingoe and Thedwestry. [8]

The county division was formed from part of the abolished Western Division, including Sudbury, Hadleigh and Haverhill.

1918–1950: The Municipal Borough of Sudbury, the Urban Districts of Glemsford, Hadleigh, and Haverhill, the Rural Districts of Clare, Cosford, and Melford, and parts of the Rural Districts of Moulton and Thingoe. [9]

Marginal changes to boundaries.

On abolition, western and northern parts, including Haverhill, transferred to Bury St Edmunds.  Central, southern and western parts, including Sudbury and Hadleigh, formed part of the new county constituency of Sudbury and Woodbridge.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1559–1640

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1559 Clement Throckmorton Henry Fortescue [1]
1563 John Heigham Thomas Andrews [1]
1571John Hunt John Gurdon [1]
1572Richard EdenMartin Cole [1]
1584Edward WaldegraveHenry Blagge [1]
1586Henry BlaggeGeoffrey Rusham [1]
1588 Thomas Eden Thomas Jermin [1]
1593 William Fortescue Dudley Fortescue [1]
1597George Waldegrave John Clapham [1]
1601Philip GawdyEdward Glascock [1]
1604–1611Sir Thomas Beckingham Thomas Eden, jnr
1614 Robert Crane Henry Binge
1621 Edward Osborne Brampton Gurdon
1624 Robert Crane Sir William Pooley
1625 Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston Robert Crane
1626 Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston Thomas Smith
1628 Sir Robert Crane Sir William Pooley
1629–1640No Parliaments summoned

MPs 1640–1844

Year1st Member1st Party2nd Member2nd Party
April 1640 Sir Robert Crane Parliamentarian Richard Pepys
November 1640 (Sir) Simonds d'Ewes [10] Parliamentarian
February 1643Crane died – seat left vacant
1645 Brampton Gurdon Parliamentarian
December 1648D'Ewes ceased sitting after Pride's Purge
1653Sudbury was unrepresented in the Barebones Parliament
1654 John Fothergill Sudbury had only one seat in the First and
Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1656
January 1659 Samuel Hassel
May 1659 Not represented in the restored Rump
April 1660 John Gurdon Parliamentarian Joseph Brand
1661 Thomas Waldegrave Isaac Appleton
1662 Sir Robert Cordell
1677 Sir Gervase Elwes Whig
February 1679 Gervase Elwes
September 1679 Sir Gervase Elwes Whig
1685 Sir John Cordell Tory Sir George Wenyeve
1689 Sir John Poley Tory [11] Philip Gurdon Whig [11]
February 1690 John Robinson Whig [12]
October 1690 Sir Thomas Barnardiston Whig
1698 Samuel Kekewich
1699 John Gurdon Tory [12]
1700 Sir Gervase Elwes Whig
January 1701 Sir John Cordell Tory [12]
December 1701 Joseph Haskin Stiles Whig [12]
1703 George Dashwood Tory [12]
1705 Philip Skippon Whig [12]
1706 Sir Hervey Elwes Whig
1710 John Mead Tory [12] Lieutenant-General Robert Echlin Tory [12]
1713 Sir Hervey Elwes Whig
1715 Thomas Western
1722 John Knight Whig Colonel William Windham
1727 Carteret Leathes
January 1734 Richard Jackson
April 1734 Richard Price Edward Stephenson
1741 Thomas Fonnereau Carteret Leathes
1747 Richard Rigby Whig
1754 Thomas Walpole
1761 John Henniker
1768 (Sir) Patrick Blake [13] (Sir) Walden Hanmer [14]
1774 [15] Thomas Fonnereau Philip Champion Crespigny Whig
1775 Sir Patrick Blake, Bt Sir Walden Hanmer
1780 Philip Champion Crespigny [16] Whig
1781 Sir James Marriott
1784 William Smith Whig John Langston
1790 John Hippisley Whig Thomas Champion Crespigny
1796 William Smith Whig Sir James Marriott
1802 Sir John Hippisley Whig [17] John Pytches Whig [17]
1807 Emanuel Felix Agar Tory [17]
1812 Charles Wyatt Tory [17]
1818 William Heygate Tory [17] John Broadhurst Whig [17]
1820 Charles Augustus Tulk Whig [17]
1826 John Wilks Whig [17] Bethel Walrond Whig [17]
1828 John Norman Macleod Tory [17]
1830 Sir John Walsh Tory [17]
1831 Digby Cayley Wrangham Tory [17]
1832 Michael Angelo Taylor Whig [17]
Jul. 1834 Sir Edward Barnes [18] Tory [17]
Dec. 1834 Conservative [17] Conservative [17]
1835 John Bagshaw Whig [19] [20] [21] [22] [17] Benjamin Smith Whig [17]
July 1837 Sir James Hamilton Conservative [17] Sir Edward Barnes Conservative [17]
December 1837 Joseph Bailey Conservative [17]
1838 Sir John Walsh Conservative [17]
1840 George Tomline Conservative [17]
1841 [23] Frederick Villiers Meynell Whig [17] [24] David Ochterlony Dyce Sombre Whig [17] [24]
29 July 1844Constituency disfranchised for corruption and incorporated into Western Suffolk

MPs 1885–1950

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Sir William Quilter Liberal
1886 Sir William Quilter Liberal Unionist
1906 William Heaton-Armstrong Liberal
1910 (January) Sir Cuthbert Quilter Conservative
1918 Stephen Howard Coalition Liberal
1922 Herbert Mercer Conservative
1923 Frederick Loverseed Liberal
1924 Henry Walter Burton Conservative
1945 Roland Hamilton Labour
1950 constituency abolished

Elections

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1830: Sudbury [17] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Bethel WalrondUnopposed
Tory John Walsh Unopposed
Whig hold
Tory gain from Whig
General election 1831: Sudbury [17] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Tory John Walsh 544 46.0
Tory Digby Cayley Wrangham 400 33.8
Whig William Windham23920.2
Majority16113.6
Turnout 656c.65.6
Registered electors c.1,000
Tory hold
Tory gain from Whig
General election 1832: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Michael Angelo Taylor 263 33.0 +22.9
Tory John Walsh 253 31.8 14.2
Tory Digby Cayley Wrangham 23429.44.4
Whig John Bagshaw 465.84.3
Turnout 47493.1c.+27.5
Registered electors 509
Majority101.2N/A
Whig gain from Tory Swing +16.1
Majority192.411.2
Tory hold Swing 12.8

Taylor's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 25 July 1834: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Tory Edward Barnes 264 50.1 11.1
Whig John Bagshaw 26349.9+11.1
Majority10.22.2
Turnout 52796.3+3.2
Registered electors 547
Tory gain from Whig Swing 11.1
General election 1835: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig John Bagshaw 285 28.4 4.6
Whig Benjamin Smith 251 25.0 +19.2
Conservative Edward Barnes 24124.07.8
Conservative Stephens Lyne-Stephens 22722.66.8
Majority101.00.2
Turnout 52795.1+2.0
Registered electors 554
Whig hold Swing +1.4
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +13.3
General election 1837: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Barnes 372 42.1 +18.1
Conservative Sir James Hamilton, 2nd Baronet, of Woodbrook 342 38.7 +16.1
Whig William Abel Smith15117.111.3
Whig Sir Thomas Edward Michell Turton, 2nd Baronet192.122.9
Majority19121.6N/A
Turnout 50283.811.3
Registered electors 599
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +17.6
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +16.6

Hamilton's resignation caused a by-election.

By-election, 12 December 1837: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Joseph Bailey 303 54.3 26.5
Whig James Morrison 25545.7+26.5
Majority488.613.0
Turnout 55892.7+8.9
Registered electors 602
Conservative hold Swing 26.5

Barnes' death caused a by-election.

By-election, 27 March 1838: Sudbury [17] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Walsh 293 52.4 28.4
Whig John Bagshaw 26647.6+28.4
Majority274.816.8
Turnout 55992.9+9.1
Registered electors 602
Conservative hold Swing 28.4

Elections in the 1840s

Walsh resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds in order to contest a by-election at Radnorshire, causing a by-election.

By-election, 5 June 1840: Sudbury [26] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative George Tomline Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1841: Sudbury [26] [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Frederick Villiers Meynell 284 25.5 +8.4
Whig David Ochterlony Dyce Sombre 281 25.2 +23.1
Conservative David Jones27424.617.5
Conservative Charles Taylor27424.614.1
Majority70.6N/A
Turnout 55792.4+8.6
Registered electors 603
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +12.1
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +19.5

After an election petition was lodged, a Royal Commission found proof of extensive bribery and the writ was suspended in 1844. The constituency was absorbed into West Suffolk.

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1885: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Cuthbert Quilter 4,913 58.7
Conservative Thomas Weller Poley [28] 3,46141.3
Majority1,45217.4
Turnout 8,37479.6
Registered electors 10,522
Liberal win (new seat)
General election 1886: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Cuthbert Quilter Unopposed
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1892: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Cuthbert Quilter 5,111 63.8 N/A
Liberal Arthur Graeme Ogilvie2,90536.2New
Majority2,20627.6N/A
Turnout 8,01675.4N/A
Registered electors 10,638
Liberal Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1895: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Cuthbert Quilter Unopposed
Liberal Unionist hold

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1900: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Cuthbert Quilter Unopposed
Liberal Unionist hold
Heaton-Armstrong Heaton-Armstrong.jpg
Heaton-Armstrong
General election 1906: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal William Heaton-Armstrong 4,201 50.8 New
Liberal Unionist Cuthbert Quilter 4,06549.2N/A
Majority1361.6N/A
Turnout 8,26681.7N/A
Registered electors 10,121
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing N/A

Elections in the 1910s

Hirst Portrait of Francis Wrigley Hirst.jpg
Hirst
General election January 1910: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Cuthbert Quilter 5,026 55.9 +6.7
Liberal Francis Hirst 3,95844.1−6.7
Majority1,06811.8N/A
Turnout 8,98489.5+7.8
Registered electors 10,036
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +6.7
General election December 1910: Sudbury [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Cuthbert Quilter Unopposed
Conservative hold

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

Howard Stephen Goodwin Howard.jpg
Howard
General election 1918: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Stephen Howard 6,656 52.1 New
C Unionist Richard George Proby5,74644.9N/A
Labour Joseph Rouse Hicks*3903.0New
Majority9107.2N/A
Turnout 12,79248.4N/A
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
* some records describe Hicks as an 'Agriculture' candidate

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1922: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Herbert Mercer 7,298 47.0 +2.1
National Liberal Stephen Howard 5,41034.9New
Liberal Ernest William Tanner2,81318.1-34.0
Majority1,88812.1N/A
Turnout 15,52159.3+10.9
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing
General election 1923: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Frederick Loverseed 8,813 52.0 * -1.0
Unionist Herbert Mercer 8,14848.0+1.0
Majority6654.0N/A
Turnout 16,96163.8+4.5
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing -1.0
General election 1924: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Henry Burton 10,579 53.6 +5.6
Liberal Frederick Loverseed 9,16846.4-5.6
Majority1,4117.2N/A
Turnout 19,74773.3= +9.5
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +5.6
General election 1929: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Henry Burton 9,715 40.2 -13.4
Liberal Alan Sainsbury 8,30934.4-12.0
Labour W. Jack Shingfield6,14725.4New
Majority1,4065.8-1.4
Turnout 24,17175.9+2.6
Unionist hold Swing -0.7

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Burton 13,500 55.3 +15.1
Liberal Alan Sainsbury 10,92944.7+10.3
Majority2,57110.6+4.8
Turnout 24,42976.7+0.8
Conservative hold Swing +2.4
General election 1935: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Burton 11,700 49.3 -6.0
Liberal Alan Sainsbury 8,34435.2-9.5
Labour Horace Denton3,67015.5New
Majority3,35614.1+3.5
Turnout 23,71474.4-2.3
Conservative hold Swing +1.7

Elections in the 1940s

General Election 1939–40:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1945: Sudbury [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Roland Hamilton 9,906 40.3 +24.8
Conservative Henry Burton 9,65939.2-10.1
Liberal Margaret Hitchcock5,04520.5-14.7
Majority2471.1N/A
Turnout 24,61069.5-4.9
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Hasler, P. W., ed. (1981). "Sudbury". The House of Commons 1558-1603. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 26 November 2022.
  2. Page 50, Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (2nd edition - London: St Martin's Press, 1957)
  3. Page 105, Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (2nd edition - London: St Martin's Press, 1957)
  4. Letter 736, 3rd March 1761, Full text of "The letters of Horace Walpole, fourth earl of Orford
  5. Page 320, Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (2nd edition - London: St Martin's Press, 1957)
  6. Page 105, Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (2nd edition - London: St Martin's Press, 1957)
  7. M.C. Rintoul (1993). Dictionary of Real People and Places in Fiction . Taylor & Francis. p.  872. ISBN   9780415059992.
  8. Great Britain, Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England and Wales. The public general acts. unknown library. Proprietors of the Law Journal Reports, 1884.
  9. S., Craig, Fred W. (1972). Boundaries of parliamentary constituencies 1885–1972;. Chichester: Political Reference Publications. ISBN   0900178094. OCLC   539011.
  10. Created a baronet, July 1641
  11. 1 2 Paula Watson (1983). "Sudbury". In Henning, B. D. (ed.). The House of Commons 1660-1690. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 26 November 2022.
  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 D. W. Hayton (2002). "Sudbury". In Hayton, David; Cruickshanks, Eveline; Handley, Stuart (eds.). The House of Commons 1690-1715. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 26 November 2022.
  13. Created a baronet, September 1772
  14. Created a baronet, May 1774
  15. On petition, the result of the election of 1774 was overturned: Fonnereau and Crespigny were declared not to have been duly elected and their opponents, Blake and Hanmer, were seated in their place
  16. On petition, Crespigny was declared not to have been duly elected and his opponent, Marriott was seated in his place
  17. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. pp. 61–63. Retrieved 12 December 2018 via Google Books.
  18. Elected on the casting vote of the returning officer after a tie in votes. His opponent petitioned against the decision, denying that the returning officer was entitled to a casting vote, but Parliament was dissolved before the issue had been settled.
  19. The Spectator, Volume 7. F. C. Westley. 1834. p. 702. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
  20. The Spectator, Volume 10. F. C. Westley. 1837. p. 651. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
  21. Sperling, Charles Frederick Denne (1896). A short history of the borough of Sudbury, in the county of Suffolk, compiled from materials collected by W.W. Hodson. Sudbury: Sudbury, Printed by B.R. Marten. pp.  162, 259. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
  22. "General Intelligence" . Coventry Standard. 24 June 1853. p. 2. Retrieved 13 May 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. The 1841 election was declared void on petition and a Royal Commission was appointed to investigate, which eventually led to the disfranchisement of the constituency
  24. 1 2 "Electoral Decisions" . Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser. 3 July 1841. p. 24. Retrieved 12 December 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. 1 2 Margaret Escott (2009). "Sudbury". In Fisher, David (ed.). The House of Commons 1820-1832. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 26 November 2022.
  26. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832–1885 (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. p. 294. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  27. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885–1918. London: Macmillan Press. p. 394. ISBN   9781349022984.
  28. ‘WELLER-POLEY, Thomas’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 22 Sept 2017
  29. Cambridge Independent Press 16 Jan 1914
  30. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 British parliamentary election results, 1918–1949 (Craig)