1796 British general election

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Union flag 1606 (Kings Colors).svg
  1790 25 May – 29 June 1796 (1796-05-25 1796-06-29) 1801 (UK)  

All 558 seats in the House of Commons
280 seats needed for a majority
 First partySecond party
  George-Romney-xx-William-Pitt-the-Younger-xx-Tate-Britain.jpg Reynolds Charles James Fox.jpg
Leader William Pitt Charles James Fox
Party Pittite Foxite
Leader's seat Cambridge University Westminster
Seats won42495
Seat changeIncrease2.svg84Decrease2.svg88

Prime Minister before election

William Pitt
Pittite

Prime Minister after
election

William Pitt
Pittite

The 1796 British general election returned members to serve in the 18th and last House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain. They were summoned before the Union of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. The members in office in Great Britain at the end of 1800 continued to serve in the first Parliament of the United Kingdom (180102).

Contents

Political situation

Great Britain had been at war with France since 1792. The Prime Minister since 1783, William Pitt the Younger, led a broad wartime coalition of Whig and Tory politicians.

The principal opposition to Pitt was a relatively weak faction of Whigs, led by Charles James Fox. For four years after 1797 opposition attendance at Westminster was sporadic as Fox pursued a strategy of secession from Parliament. Only a small group, led by George Tierney, had attended frequently to oppose the ministers. As Foord observes "only once did the minority reach seventy-five, and it was often less than ten".

Dates of election

The period between the first and last returns was 25 May to 29 June 1796.

Summary of the constituencies

Monmouthshire (One County constituency with two members and one single member Borough constituency) is included in Wales in these tables. Sources for this period may include the county in England.

Table 1: Constituencies and Members, by type and country

CountryBCCCUCTotal CBMPCMPUMPTotal Members
Flag of England.svg  England 202392243404784486
  Wales 13130261314027
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 15300451530045
 Total2308223144321224558

Table 2: Number of seats per constituency, by type and country

CountryBC×1BC×2BC×4CC×1CC×2UC×2Total C
Flag of England.svg  England 419620392243
  Wales 1300121026
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1500300045
 Total32196242402314

Sources:

See also

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