Heroes in Hell (book)

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Heroes in Hell
MorrisHeroesHell.jpg
Author Janet Morris, ed.
Country United States
Language English
Series Heroes in Hell
Genre Bangsian fantasy
Shared world
Fantasy
Publisher Baen Books
Publication date
March 1986
Media type Print (paperback)
ISBN 978-0-671-65555-6
Followed byThe Gates of Hell

Heroes in Hell is an anthology book and the first volume of its namesake series, created by American writer Janet Morris. The book placed eighth in the annual Locus Poll for Best Anthology in 1987. [1] "Newton Sleep" by Gregory Benford, originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction , received a Nebula Award nomination in 1986, [2] as well as placing 16th in its category in the Locus Poll.

<i>Heroes in Hell</i>

Heroes in Hell is a series of shared world fantasy books, within the genre Bangsian fantasy, created and edited by Janet Morris and written by her, Chris Morris, C. J. Cherryh and others. The first 12 books in the series were published by Baen Books between 1986 and 1989, and stories from the series include one Hugo Award winner and Nebula nominee,, as well as one other Nebula Award nominee. The series was resurrected in 2011 by Janet Morris with the thirteenth book and eighth anthology in the series, Lawyers in Hell, followed by six more anthologies and three novels between 2012 and 2018.

Janet Morris American novelist

Janet Ellen Morris is an American author of fiction and nonfiction, best known for her fantasy and science fiction and her authorship of a non-lethal weapons concept for the U.S. military.

Locus: The Magazine of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field, is an American magazine published monthly in Oakland, California. It is the news organ and trade journal for the English language science fiction and fantasy fields. It also publishes comprehensive listings of all new books published in the genres. The magazine also presents the annual Locus Awards. Locus Online was launched in April 1997, as a semi-autonomous web version of Locus Magazine.

Contents

Contents

In order of presentation, the anthology contains:

Chris Morris (author) American writer

Christopher Crosby Morris is an American author of fiction and non-fiction, as well as a lyricist, musical composer, and singer-songwriter. He is married to author Janet Morris. He is a defense policy and strategy analyst and a principal in M2 Technologies, Inc. He writes primarily as Chris Morris, a shortened form of his name, but occasionally uses pseudonyms.

Gregory Benford Science fiction author and astrophysicist

Gregory Benford is an American science fiction author and astrophysicist who is Professor Emeritus at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine. He is a contributing editor of Reason magazine.

<i>The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction</i> digest magazine

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction is a U.S. fantasy and science fiction magazine first published in 1949 by Fantasy House, a subsidiary of Lawrence Spivak's Mercury Press. Editors Anthony Boucher and J. Francis McComas had approached Spivak in the mid-1940s about creating a fantasy companion to Spivak's existing mystery title, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. The first issue was titled The Magazine of Fantasy, but the decision was quickly made to include science fiction as well as fantasy, and the title was changed correspondingly with the second issue. F&SF was quite different in presentation from the existing science fiction magazines of the day, most of which were in pulp format: it had no interior illustrations, no letter column, and text in a single column format, which in the opinion of science fiction historian Mike Ashley "set F&SF apart, giving it the air and authority of a superior magazine".

Reception

Reviewer Chuq von Rospach declared "The concept is silly," going on to say that "the plots are for the most part banal, and the characters are unsympathetic. The writing is simplistic and the continuity is questionable. In other words, they borrowed all of the worst parts of Thieves' World and forgot to include what makes it worthwhile." [6] The Encyclopedia of Hell states "Author Janet Morris created a unique underworld saga in her 1984 book, Heroes in Hell, a witty novel that declares 'Nobody who is anybody went to heaven.'...[it] weaves myth, legend, fact, and fantasy into a fascinating tapestry of underworld lore." [7]

<i>Thieves World</i>

Thieves' World is a shared world fantasy series created by Robert Lynn Asprin in 1978. The original series comprised twelve anthologies, including stories by such science fiction authors as Poul Anderson, John Brunner, Andrew J. Offutt, C. J. Cherryh, Janet Morris, and Chris Morris. The Morrises introduced The Sacred Band of Stepsons in Thieves' World and spun off a series of novels about them and their ancient cavalry commander, Tempus. The first three novels in The Sacred Band of Stepsons saga were authorized Thieves World novels. Marion Zimmer Bradley was an early contributor but spun off her main character in the novel Lythande (1986) and did not return for later volumes. The series went on hiatus after the twelfth anthology. In addition to the official anthologies, several authors published novels set in the milieu of Thieves World.

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References

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

  1. "1987 Locus Awards". Locus . Archived from the original on 2011-08-05. Retrieved 2011-07-13.
  2. "Nebula Final Ballots from the 1980s". SFWA Nebula Awards. Retrieved 2011-07-13.
  3. 1 2 3 4 The Locus Index to Science Fiction: 1984-1998
  4. Far Frontiers, vol. 4, Baen Books, January 1986, p.230
  5. Rhialto the Marvellous, Baen Books, 1985 pb edition, p.223
  6. "OtherRealms Pico Reviews for April, 1986", OtherRealms, volume 1, number 3, April 1986.
  7. Van Scott 1998, p. 162.