Trust Territory (novel)

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Trust Territory
Trust Territory front cover.jpg
Author Janet Morris Chris Morris
Language English language
SeriesThreshold
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Roc
Publication date
March 3, 1992
Media typePrint
Pages272
ISBN 978-0-451-45126-2
Preceded by Threshold  
Followed by The Stalk  

Trust Territory is a science fiction novel by American writers Chris Morris and Janet Morris, published in 1992. It is the second book of the Threshold trilogy.

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