Howard Gardner

Last updated
Howard Gardner
Howard Gardner.jpg
Born
Howard Earl Gardner

(1943-07-11) July 11, 1943 (age 75)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materHarvard College
Known for Theory of multiple intelligences
Spouse(s) Ellen Winner
Scientific career
Fields Psychology, education
InstitutionsHarvard University
Influences Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, Nelson Goodman [1]
Website www.howardgardner.com

Howard Earl Gardner (born July 11, 1943) is an American developmental psychologist and the John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. He is currently the senior director of Harvard Project Zero, and since 1995, he has been the co-director of The Good Project. [2]

Harvard Graduate School of Education

The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the top schools of education in the United States. It was founded in 1920, when it was the first school to establish the Ed.D. degree.

Harvard University private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 postgraduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.

Contents

Gardner has written hundreds of research articles [3] and thirty books that have been translated into more than thirty languages. He is best known for his theory of multiple intelligences, as outlined in his 1983 book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. [2]

The theory of multiple intelligences differentiates human intelligence into specific 'modalities', rather than seeing intelligence as dominated by a single general ability. Howard Gardner proposed this model in his 1983 book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. According to the theory, an intelligence 'modality' must fulfill eight criteria:

  1. potential for brain isolation by brain damage
  2. place in evolutionary history
  3. presence of core operations
  4. susceptibility to encoding
  5. a distinct developmental progression
  6. the existence of savants, prodigies and other exceptional people
  7. support from experimental psychology
  8. support from psychometric findings

Early life

Howard Earl Gardner was born July 11, 1943, in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to Ralph Gardner and Hilde (née Weilheimer) Gardner, German-Jewish immigrants who fled Germany prior to World War II. [4]

Scranton, Pennsylvania City in Pennsylvania, United States of America

Scranton is the sixth-largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is the county seat and largest city of Lackawanna County in Northeastern Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley and hosts a federal court building for the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. With a population of 77,291, it is the largest city in the Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of about 570,000.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Gardner described himself as "a studious child who gained much pleasure from playing the piano". [5] Although Gardner never became a professional pianist, he taught piano from 1958 to 1969. [3]

Education was of the utmost importance in the Gardner home. While his parents had hoped that he would attend Phillips Academy Andover in Massachusetts, Gardner opted to attend a school closer to his hometown in Pennsylvania, Wyoming Seminary. Gardner had a desire to learn and greatly excelled in school. [6]

Wyoming Seminary

Wyoming Seminary, founded in 1844, is a Methodist college preparatory school located in the Wyoming Valley of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The "Lower School," which consists of preschool - 8th grade students, is located in Forty Fort. The "Upper School," comprising 9th-grade to postgraduate students, is located in Kingston. It is near the Susquehanna River and the city of Wilkes-Barre. Locally and in some publications, it is sometimes referred to as "Sem." As a boarding school, only Upper School students are given the opportunity to live (board) on campus. Slightly more than one-third of the Upper School student body reside on campus.

Career

Gardner graduated from Harvard University in 1965 with an AB in social relations, and studied under the renowned Erik Erikson. He would go on to obtain his PhD in developmental psychology at Harvard while working with psychologists Roger Brown and Jerome Bruner, and philosopher Nelson Goodman. [4]

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Erik Erikson American German-born psychoanalyst & essayist

Erik Homburger Erikson was a German-American developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst known for his theory on psychological development of human beings. He may be most famous for coining the phrase identity crisis. His son, Kai T. Erikson, is a noted American sociologist.

Doctor of Philosophy Postgraduate academic degree awarded by universities in many countries

A Doctor of Philosophy is the highest university degree that is conferred after a course of study by universities in most English-speaking countries. PhDs are awarded for programs across the whole breadth of academic fields. As an earned research degree, those studying for a PhD are usually required to produce original research that expands the boundaries of knowledge, normally in the form of a thesis or dissertation, and defend their work against experts in the field. The completion of a PhD is often a requirement for employment as a university professor, researcher, or scientist in many fields. Individuals who have earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree may, in many jurisdictions, use the title Doctor or, in non-English-speaking countries, variants such as "Dr. phil." with their name, although the proper etiquette associated with this usage may also be subject to the professional ethics of their own scholarly field, culture, or society. Those who teach at universities or work in academic, educational, or research fields are usually addressed by this title "professionally and socially in a salutation or conversation." Alternatively, holders may use post-nominal letters such as "Ph.D.", "PhD", or "DPhil". It is, however, considered incorrect to use both the title and post-nominals at the same time.

For his postdoctoral fellowship, Gardner worked alongside Norman Geschwind at Boston Veterans Administration Hospital and continued his work there for another 20 years. [3] Gardner began teaching at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1986. Since 1995, much of the focus of his work has been on The GoodWork Project, now part of a larger initiative known as The Good Project that encourages excellence, ethics, and engagement in work, digital life, and beyond.

In 2000, Gardner, Kurt Fischer, and their colleagues at the Harvard Graduate School of Education established the master's degree program in Mind, Brain and Education. This program was thought to be the first of its kind around the world. Many universities in both the United States and abroad have since developed similar programs. Four years later in 2004, Gardner would continue writing about the mind and brain and would publish Changing Minds: The Art and Science of Changing Our Own and Other People's Minds, a book about seven forms of mind-change. [4]

Theory and criticism

According to Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, humans have several different ways of processing information, and these ways are relatively independent of one another. The theory is a critique of the standard intelligence theory, which emphasizes the correlation among abilities, as well as traditional measures like IQ tests that typically only account for linguistic, logical, and spatial abilities. Since 1999, Gardner has identified eight intelligences: linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, spatial, bodily/kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalistic. [7] Gardner and colleagues have also considered two additional intelligences, existential and pedagogical. [8] [9] Many teachers, school administrators, and special educators have been inspired by Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences as it has allowed for the idea that there is more than one way to define a person's intellect. [10]

Gardner's definition of intelligence has been met with some criticism in education circles [11] as well as in the field of psychology. Perhaps the strongest and most enduring critique of his theory of multiple intelligences centers on its lack of empirical evidence, much of which points to a single construct of intelligence called "g". [12] Gardner responds that his theory is based entirely on applied evidence as opposed to experimental evidence, as he does not believe experimental evidence is appropriate for a theoretical synthesis. [13] [14]

Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences can be seen as both a departure from and a continuation of the last century's work on the subject of human intelligence. Other prominent psychologists whose contributions variously developed or expanded the field of study include Charles Spearman, Louis Thurstone, Edward Thorndike, and Robert Sternberg.

In 1967, Professor Nelson Goodman started an educational program called Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, which began with a focus in arts education and now spans throughout a wide variety of educational arenas. [15] Howard Gardner and David Perkins were founding Research Assistants and later Co-Directed Project Zero from 1972-2000. Project Zero's mission is to understand and enhance learning, thinking, and creativity in the arts, as well as humanistic and scientific disciplines at the individual and institutional levels. [16]

Good Project founders. From left: William Damon, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Gardner Goodworkteam.jpg
Good Project founders. From left: William Damon, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Gardner

For almost two decades, in collaboration with William Damon, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and several other colleagues, Gardner has been directing research at The Good Project on the nature of good work, good play, and good collaboration. The goal of his research is to determine what it means to achieve work that is at once excellent, engaging, and carried out in an ethical way. With colleagues Lynn Barendsen, Wendy Fischman, and Carrie James, Gardner has developed curricular toolkits on these topics for use in educational and professional circles. [17]

Achievements and awards

In 1981 Gardner was the recipient of a MacArthur Prize Fellowship. In 1990 he became the first American to receive the University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Education. [18] In 1985, The National Psychology Awards for Excellence in the Media, awarded Gardner The Book Award for Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, which was published by Basic Books. [19] In 1987, he received the William James Award from the American Psychological Association. [20] In 2000 he received a fellowship from the John S. Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Four years later he was named an Honorary Professor at East China Normal University in Shanghai. In the years 2005 and 2008 he was selected by Foreign Policy and Prospect magazines as one of the top 100 most influential public intellectuals in the world. [21] In 2011, he won the Prince of Asturias Award in Social Sciences for his development of multiple intelligences theory. [21] In 2015, he received the Brock International Prize in Education. [22]

He has received 31 honorary degrees from colleges and universities around the world, including institutions in Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, South Korea, and Spain. [23]

Personal life

Howard Gardner is married to Ellen Winner, Professor of Psychology at Boston College. They have one child, Benjamin. Gardner has three children from an earlier marriage: Kerith (1969), Jay (1971), and Andrew (1976); and four grandchildren, Oscar (2005), Agnes (2011), Olivia (2015), and Faye Marguerite (2016). [5]

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Edward Thorndike American psychologist

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Jean Piaget Swiss psychologist, biologist, logician, philosopher and academic

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Pedagogy the study of education

Pedagogy refers more broadly to the theory and practice of education, and how this influences the growth of learners. Pedagogy, taken as an academic discipline, is the study of how knowledge and skills are exchanged in an educational context, and it considers the interactions that take place during learning. Pedagogies vary greatly, as they reflect the different social, political, cultural contexts from which they emerge. Pedagogy is the act of teaching. Theories of pedagogy increasingly identify the student as an agent, and the teacher as a facilitator. Conventional western pedagogies, however, view the teacher as knowledge holder and student as the recipient of knowledge.

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References

  1. Winner, Ellen. "The History of Howard Gardner". Archived from the original on 2007-06-29.
  2. 1 2 Gordon, Lynn Melby. "Gardner, Howard (1943–)." Encyclopedia of Human Development. Ed. Neil J. Salkind. Vol. 2. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Reference, 2006. 552-553. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 27 Oct. 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 Doorey, Marie (2001). Bonnie R. Strickland, executive editor (eds.). Gardner, Howard Earl. The Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Gale Group. pp. 272–273, 699. ISBN   978-0-7876-4786-5 . Retrieved 2014-12-07.CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) a part of the Gale Virtual Reference Library.
  4. 1 2 3 Anderman, Eric; Anderman, Lynley, eds. (2009). Psychology of Classroom Learning: An Encyclopedia. 1. Detroit, USA: Macmillan Reference. pp. 423–425. Retrieved 28 Dec 2014. a part of the Gale Virtual Reference Library.
  5. 1 2 "Howard Gardner Project Zero Biography". Pz.harvard.edu. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  6. Webber, Jacob. "Gardner, Howard." Encyclopedia of the History of Psychological Theories. Ed. Robert W. Rieber. Vol. 1. New York: Springer, 2012. 464-465. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.
  7. "Understanding Multiple Intelligences Theory" . Retrieved 7 August 2016.
  8. "The Theory of Multiple Intelligences: As Psychology, As Education, As Social Science Howard Gardner" (PDF). Howardgardner01.files.wordpress.com. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  9. "Home - Mi Oasis". Mi Oasis. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  10. Gordon, Lynn Melby. "Gardner, Howard (1943–)." Encyclopedia of Human Development. Ed. Neil J. Salkind. Vol. 2. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Reference, 2006. 552-553. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.
  11. http://educationnext.org/reframing-the-mind/
  12. Klein, Perry D (1998). "A Response to Howard Gardner: Falsifiability, Empirical Evidence, and Pedagogical Usefulness in Educational Psychologies". Canadian Journal of Education. 23 (1): 103–112. doi:10.2307/1585969. JSTOR   1585969.
  13. Gardner, Howard (2006). "On failing to grasp the core of MI theory: A response to Visser et al". Intelligence. 34 (5): 503–505. doi:10.1016/j.intell.2006.04.002.
  14. Gardner, Howard; Moran, Seana (2006). "The science of multiple intelligences theory: A response to Lynn Waterhouse". Educational Psychologist. 41 (4): 227–232. doi:10.1207/s15326985ep4104_2.
  15. "Project Zero: History". Pz.harvard.edu. Archived from the original on 14 October 2014. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  16. "Harvard Project Zero". Pzweb.harvard.edu. Archived from the original on 14 October 2014. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  17. Mucinskas, Daniel; Gardner, Howard (2013). "Educating for Good Work: From Research to Practice". British Journal of Educational Studies. 61 (4): 453–470. doi:10.1080/00071005.2013.829210.
  18. "1990 - Howard Gardner". Grawemeyer.org. Archived from the original on 14 October 2014. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  19. "National psychology awards for excellence in the media" . Retrieved 2014-10-12.
  20. "Howard Gardner, 2011 Prince of Asturias Award for Social Sciences - The Prince of Asturias Foundation". Fpa.es. Retrieved 2014-02-10.
  21. 1 2 "Howard Gardner, 2011 Prince of Asturias Award for Social Sciences - The Prince of Asturias Foundation". Fpa.es. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  22. "Brock International Prize in Education Laureates". BrockPrize.org. Retrieved 2017-07-19.
  23. "Howard Gardner". Pz.harvard.edu. Archived from the original on 2012-08-15. Retrieved 2012-08-13.

Further reading