Jean Meeus

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Jean Meeus (born 12 December 1928) is a Belgian meteorologist and amateur astronomer specializing in celestial mechanics, spherical astronomy, and mathematical astronomy. [1] [2]

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Meeus studied mathematics at the University of Leuven in Belgium, where he received the Degree of Licentiate in 1953. From then until his retirement in 1993, he was a meteorologist at Brussels Airport. [2]

Awards and honors

In 1986, he won the Amateur Achievement Award of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. [3] The main belt asteroid 2213 Meeus was named after him by the International Astronomical Union in 1981 for his contributions to the field. [1] [2]

Publications

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November 1957 lunar eclipse

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A partial lunar eclipse took place on August 5, 1952. The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 53.2% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 2 hours and 27 minutes. The moon's apparent diameter was larger and Supermoon because the eclipse occurred only 45 minutes before perigee.

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June 2048 lunar eclipse

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April 2051 lunar eclipse

A total lunar eclipse will take place on April 26, 2051.

October 2050 lunar eclipse

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References

  1. 1 2 "(2213) Meeus". Minor Planet Center . International Astronomical Union . Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 Meeus, Jean (1997). Mathematical Astronomy Morsels. Richmond, Virginia: Willmann-Bell. p. (Author Biography). ISBN   0-943396-51-4.
  3. Wolff, S.; Fraknoi, A. (June 1986). "Jean Meeus received the Amateur Achievement Award of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific". Mercury. Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 15 (5): 142–3. Bibcode:1986Mercu..15R.142W.
  4. Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean (October 2006). "Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000". Eclipse Web Site. NASA.
  5. Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean (January 2009). "Five Millennium Canon of Lunar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000". Eclipse Web Site. NASA.
Preceded by
Gregg Thompson & Robert Evans
Amateur Achievement Award of Astronomical Society of the Pacific
1986
Succeeded by
Clinton B. Ford