John Swofford

Last updated
John Swofford
John Swofford.JPG
Commissioner of the
Atlantic Coast Conference
Assumed office
1997
Preceded by Gene Corrigan
Personal details
Born
John Douglas Swofford

(1948-12-06) December 6, 1948 (age 70)
North Wilkesboro, North Carolina
NationalityAmerican
Alma mater University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ohio University
Swofford (right) with Ken Haines KenHainesJohnSwofford.jpg
Swofford (right) with Ken Haines

John Swofford (born 1948) is the Commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference in the United States of America in which its fifteen member universities compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

Swofford was born on December 6, 1948 in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. While at Wilkes Central High School, he played as quarterback for the Wilkes Central Eagles football team and was twice selected to the all-state football team. He was awarded a prestigious Morehead Scholarship to attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he also played for the football team. He holds a master's degree in Sports Management from Ohio University. From 1980 to 1997 he was the athletic director for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

North Wilkesboro, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

North Wilkesboro is a town in Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States. The population was approximately 4,116 at the 2000 census and is now 4,245 as of the 2010 census. North Wilkesboro is the birthplace and original home of Lowe's Home Improvement, which continues to have a major presence in the community. The town is also known as one of the birthplaces of the sport of stock-car racing, and the North Wilkesboro Speedway was the first NASCAR-sanctioned track. Due to the town's proximity to the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains and the numerous tourist venues there, North Wilkesboro has been nicknamed the "Key to the Blue Ridge".

Blue Ridge Mountains mountain range

The Blue Ridge Mountains are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian Mountains range. The mountain range is located in the eastern United States, and extends 550 miles southwest from southern Pennsylvania through Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. This province consists of northern and southern physiographic regions, which divide near the Roanoke River gap. To the west of the Blue Ridge, between it and the bulk of the Appalachians, lies the Great Appalachian Valley, bordered on the west by the Ridge and Valley province of the Appalachian range.

Wilkes Central High School is a public high school located in Moravian Falls, North Carolina. It is a part of the Wilkes County Schools system. The school's enrollment is typically around 1,000 students. The school's district includes the towns of Wilkesboro and North Wilkesboro as well as the southern regions of Wilkes County. The current principal of the school is Dr. Dion Stocks. Wilkes Central has the largest enrollment of Wilkes County's four public high schools.

In 1997 Swofford was named the Commissioner of the ACC. During his tenure he has doubled the ACC's annual revenue, served as Chairman of the Bowl Championship Series in college football in 2000 and 2001, and expanded the ACC to include Boston College, Virginia Tech, the University of Miami, the University of Pittsburgh, Syracuse University, the University of Notre Dame, and the University of Louisville by 2014.

Bowl Championship Series American college football playoff series

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was a selection system that created five bowl game match-ups involving ten of the top ranked teams in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of American college football, including an opportunity for the top two teams to compete in the BCS National Championship Game. The system was in place for the 1998 through 2013 seasons and in 2014 was replaced by the College Football Playoff.

Boston College private research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States

Boston College is a private Jesuit research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. The university has more than 9,300 full-time undergraduates and nearly 5,000 graduate students. The university's name reflects its early history as a liberal arts college and preparatory school in Boston's South End. It is a member of the 568 Group and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Its main campus is a historic district and features some of the earliest examples of collegiate gothic architecture in North America.

University of Miami private university in Coral Gables, Florida, United States

The University of Miami is a private research university in Coral Gables, Florida. As of 2018, the university enrolls 17,331 students in 12 separate colleges/schools, including the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine in Miami's Health District, a law school on the main campus, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science focused on the study of oceanography and atmospheric sciences on Virginia Key, with research facilities at the Richmond Facility in southern Miami-Dade County.

Swofford is the brother of William Oliver Swofford (1945–2000), a pop singer professionally known as Oliver who performed from the late 1960s through the late 1970s. Swofford and his family live in Greensboro, North Carolina, where the ACC has its headquarters.

Oliver (singer) American pop singer

William Oliver Swofford, known professionally as Oliver, was an American pop singer, best known for his 1969 song "Good Morning Starshine" from the musical Hair as well as "Jean".

Greensboro, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Greensboro is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is the 3rd-most populous city in North Carolina, the 68th-most populous city in the United States, and the county seat and largest city in Guilford County and the surrounding Piedmont Triad metropolitan region. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 269,666, and in 2015 the estimated population was 285,342. Three major interstate highways in the Piedmont region of central North Carolina were built to intersect at this city.

Related Research Articles

Tobacco Road is a term used in college sports, mainly basketball, for four rival universities in North Carolina that play in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The term refers to the area's history as a major tobacco producer. The Tobacco Road teams represent the following universities:

Matthew Francis Doherty most recently was the Atlantic 10 Conference's associate commissioner for men's college basketball, resigning in April, 2019. He was also formerly an American college basketball coach and commentator as well as a scout for the NBA. Doherty was the head coach of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, the North Carolina Tar Heels, the Florida Atlantic Owls, and the SMU Mustangs. Prior to his head coaching jobs, Doherty played with North Carolina for four years before returning to basketball three years later as a color commentator for various high school and college programs, including Davidson. Later he became an assistant coach, first at Davidson, then at Kansas.

North Carolina Tar Heels intercollegiate sports teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States. Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname ""Carolina", especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels. The female athletic teams are sometimes referred to as Lady Tar Heels.

North Carolina Tar Heels baseball

The North Carolina Tar Heels baseball team, commonly referred to as Carolina, represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in NCAA Division I college baseball. They compete in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Tar Heels play their home games on campus at Boshamer Stadium, and are currently coached by Mike Fox.

The Atlantic Coast Conference is one of the premier college basketball conferences in NCAA Division I. The current ACC champion is the Duke Blue Devils.

North Carolina–NC State football rivalry

The North Carolina–NC State football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the North Carolina Tar Heels football team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and NC State Wolfpack football team of North Carolina State University. Both universities are members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and are permanent cross-division opponents. North Carolina leads the all-time series 66–36–6, though the rivalry has been very competitive in the ACC era. North Carolina State won the most recent contest, 34–28, in overtime on November 24, 2018. The Wolfpack has also won four of the last five, and nine of the last twelve games between the schools. It is annually anticipated as the biggest college football game in the state of North Carolina.

Ronald Rusnak is a former American football player. He grew up in Prince George, Virginia, and played college football at the offensive guard position for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He played for the 1971 North Carolina Tar Heels football team that compiled an 11-1 record. He was six feet, two inches tall and weighed 220 pounds while playing at North Carolina. He was twice selected as an All-Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) player and was a unanimous first-team selection to the 1972 College Football All-America Team. He also won the 1972 Jacobs Blocking Trophy as the best blocker in the ACC.

North Carolina–South Carolina football rivalry

The North Carolina–South Carolina football rivalry, also known as Battle of the Carolinas, is an American college football rivalry between the North Carolina Tar Heels football team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and South Carolina Gamecocks football team of the University of South Carolina. North Carolina leads the series 34–19–4.

The 1972 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the North Carolina Tar Heels of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1972 NCAA University Division football season. The team won its second consecutive Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) championship, going 6–0 in conference play, and played in the 1972 Sun Bowl, defeating Texas Tech by a score of 32–28. The Tar Heels ended the year ranked 12th in the AP Poll with an 11–1 record—the lone loss coming at Ohio State in their fourth game. This was the first of only four seasons where North Carolina was able to win 11 games.

The 1963 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1963 NCAA University Division football season. The Tar Heels were led by fifth-year head coach Jim Hickey and played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing as co-champions with a league record of 6–1.

The 2017 ACC Championship Game was played on December 2, 2017. It was the 13th annual ACC Football Conference Championship Game to determine the 2017 champion of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The game was held at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina. Clemson emerged victorious and became the 2017 ACC champions, beating Miami 38-3.

NC State–Wake Forest rivalry

The NC State–Wake Forest rivalry is a series of athletic contests between in-state rivals, the North Carolina State University Wolfpack and the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons. The first game was played in 1895 between the two institutions. Wake Forest was originally located in Wake Forest, North Carolina until it moved its campus across the state of North Carolina to Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1956. The two universities are members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, where they meet every year in football due to being aligned in the Atlantic Division. The schools play each other twice in basketball every season, due to being primary partners.

The 1983 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Tar Heels were led by sixth-year head coach Dick Crum and played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in second.

The 1970 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1970 NCAA University Division football season. The Tar Heels were led by fourth-year head coach Bill Dooley and played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in second.

The 1965 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1965 NCAA University Division football season. The Tar Heels were led by seventh-year head coach Jim Hickey and played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The 1956 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. The Tar Heels were led by head coach Jim Tatum, who was coaching his second season for the Tar Heels, but his first since 1942. They played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium. The team competed as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in fifth.

2019 North Carolina Tar Heels football team American college football season

The 2019 North Carolina Tar Heels football team will represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2019 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Tar Heels will be led by head coach Mack Brown, in the first season of his second stint at UNC and his eleventh overall season. They will play their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium and will compete as a member of the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

References