Langnes Peninsula

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Langnes Peninsula ( 68°28′S78°15′E / 68.467°S 78.250°E / -68.467; 78.250 Coordinates: 68°28′S78°15′E / 68.467°S 78.250°E / -68.467; 78.250 ) is a narrow rocky peninsula in Antarctica. Of irregular shape, and 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, it is the northernmost of the three main peninsulas that comprise the Vestfold Hills. The name derives from "Langneset" (the long point), applied by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) which mapped the peninsula from aerial photographs. [1]

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Tryne Fjord landform

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Langnes Fjord is a narrow fjord, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, between Langnes Peninsula and Breidnes Peninsula in the Vestfold Hills of Antarctica. It was mapped from air photos by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936–37) and named after Langnes Peninsula. John Roscoe's 1952 study of air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47) revealed that this fjord continues farther east than was previously mapped, and that it includes what had been plotted as an isolated lake which the Norwegians had called "Breidvatnet."

References

  1. "Langnes Peninsula". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2013-05-29.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Langnes Peninsula" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).