List of United Nations resolutions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

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This is a list of United Nations resolutions in the General Assembly and in the Security Council in direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as part of the United Nations' response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Contents

General Assembly

Security Council

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Ceasefire Agreement by warring parties to temporarily cease hostilities

A ceasefire, also spelled cease fire, is a temporary stoppage of a war in which each side agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions. Historically, the concept existed at least by the time of the Middle Ages, when it was known as a 'truce of God'. Ceasefires can be declared as a humanitarian gesture, be preliminary, i.e., prior to a political agreement, or definitive, i.e., with the intention of resolving a conflict. Ceasefires may be declared as part of a formal treaty, but they have also been called as part of an informal understanding between opposing forces.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1860

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1860, adopted on January 8, 2009, after recalling resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973), 1397 (2002), 1515 (2003) and 1850 (2008) on the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, the Council called for an immediate ceasefire in the Gaza War following 13 days of fighting between Israel and Hamas.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 985

United Nations Security Council resolution 985, adopted unanimously on 13 April 1995, after reaffirming resolutions 813 (1993), 856 (1993), 866 (1993), 911 (1994), 950 (1994) and 972 (1995), and 788 (1992) which imposed an arms embargo on Liberia, the council established a committee to monitor the implementation of the embargo and extended the mandate of the United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia (UNOMIL) until 30 June 1995.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1258

United Nations Security Council resolution 1258, adopted unanimously on 6 August 1999, after reaffirming Resolution 1234 (1999) on situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Council authorised the deployment of military liaison personnel to the capitals of the signatories of the Lusaka Ceasefire Agreement.

United Nations General Assembly Resolution 68/262 United Nations General Assembly resolution adopted in 2014

United Nations General Assembly Resolution 68/262 was adopted on March 27, 2014 by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly in response to the Russian annexation of Crimea and entitled "Territorial integrity of Ukraine". The non-binding resolution, which was supported by 100 United Nations member states, affirmed the General Assembly's commitment to the territorial integrity of Ukraine within its internationally recognized borders and underscored the invalidity of the 2014 Crimean referendum. Eleven nations voted against the resolution, while 58 abstained, and a further 24 states were absent when the vote took place.

The following lists events that happened with or in collaboration with the United Nations and its agencies in the year 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic Ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The virus was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and later declared a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 28 June 2021, more than 181 million cases have been confirmed, with more than 3.92 million confirmed deaths attributed to COVID-19, making it one of the deadliest pandemics in history.

Social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic Indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching consequences beyond the spread of the disease itself and efforts to quarantine it, including political, cultural, and social implications.

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have spread to Libya on 24 March 2020, when the first case was officially confirmed in Tripoli.

COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund is a global fund for supporting the work of the World Health Organization (WHO) in containing the COVID-19 pandemic. It was launched on March 13, 2020 by the United Nations Foundation and the Swiss Philanthropy Foundation in support of WHO, and was announced by the Director-General of WHO in Geneva, Switzerland. The purpose of the response fund is to "support WHO’s work, including with partners, to track and understand the spread of the virus; to ensure patients get the care they need and frontline workers get essential supplies and information; and to accelerate research and development of a vaccine and treatments for all who need them." Major companies, including Facebook, H&M, and Google have donated to the Solidarity Response Fund, in addition to several hundred thousand private individuals.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this outbreak began in December 2019.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

World Health Organizations response to the COVID-19 pandemic Overview of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic by the World Health Organization

The World Health Organization is a leading organization involved in the global coordination for mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic, within the broader United Nations response to the pandemic caused by the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 in late 2019.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on international relations

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected international relations and caused diplomatic tensions, as well as resulted in a United Nations Security Council resolution demanding a global ceasefire. Some scholars have argued that the pandemic necessitates a significant rethinking of existing approaches to international relations, with a greater focus on issues such as health diplomacy, the politics of crisis, and border politics. Others have argued that the pandemic is unlikely to lead to significant changes in the international system. Diplomatic relations have been affected due to tensions around trade and transport of medicines, diagnostic tests and hospital equipment for coronavirus disease 2019. Leaders of some countries have accused other countries for not containing the disease effectively and resulting in the uncontrolled spread of the virus. Developing nations in Latin America and Africa cannot find enough materials for testing for coronavirus disease, partly because the United States and countries in Europe are outspending the resources. Generally, it is mentioned that diplomacy and its practice have been facing some adjustments. Muzaffar S. Abduazimov mentions that currently diplomatic practice experiencing "six major trends caused by the pandemic, namely: acceleration of ICTs penetration; reappraisal of information security; ensuring the reliability of public diplomacy; further diversification of responsible duties; the growing role of psychology; and, the emergence of the hybrid diplomatic etiquette and protocol."

Food security during the COVID-19 pandemic Famines related to the pandemic caused by coronavirus disease 2019.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, food security has been a global concern – in the second quarter of 2020 there were multiple warnings of famine later in the year. According to early predictions, hundreds of thousands of people would likely die and millions more experience hunger without concerted efforts to address issues of food security. As of October 2020, these efforts were reducing the risk of widespread starvation due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A global ceasefire is a temporary stoppage of war on a planetary scale, i.e., by every country. A global ceasefire was first proposed by United Nations Secretary-General António Manuel de Oliveira Guterres on Monday, 23 March 2020, as part of the United Nations' response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On 24 June 2020, 170 UN Member States and Observers signed a non-binding statement in support of the Appeal, and on 1 July 2020, the UN Security Council passed a resolution demanding a general and immediate cessation of hostilities for at least 90 days and requesting that the UN Secretary-General accelerate the international response to the coronavirus pandemic.

United Nations Security Council resolution 2532 was adopted on 1 July, 2020. The resolution is a response to United Nations Secretary-General António Manuel de Oliveira Guterres' 'Appeal for Global Ceasefire' of Monday, 23 March, 2020, and, as the first global ceasefire, is part of the United Nations' response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

United Nations response to the COVID-19 pandemic Aspect of pandemic

The United Nations response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been led by its Secretary-General and can be divided into formal resolutions at the General Assembly and at the Security Council (UNSC), and operations via its specialized agencies and chiefly the World Health Organization in the initial stages, but involving more humanitarian-oriented agencies as the humanitarian impact became clearer, and then economic organizations, like the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the International Labour Organization, and the World Bank, as the socioeconomic implications worsened. In June 2020, the Secretary-General launched the 'UN Comprehensive Response to COVID-19'; the UN has also launched a global vaccination initiative. Given the impact on the global economy, funding has been an especial problem, as it has for ongoing operations, and the 'UN Comprehensive Response to COVID-19' has a dedicated funding package attached. The UNSC has been criticized for a slow coordinated response, especially regarding the global ceasefire, which aims to open up humanitarian access to the world's most vulnerable in conflict zones.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in September 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in September 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in October 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in October 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

References

  1. "A/RES/74/270 - E - A/RES/74/270". undocs.org. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  2. "UNGA adopts resolution calling for global solidarity, cooperation to fight COVID-19". The Economic Times. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  3. "UNGA adopts resolution on Covid-19". Livemint. 2020-04-03. Retrieved 2020-08-03.
  4. "A/RES/74/274 - E - A/RES/74/274". undocs.org. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  5. "UN General Assembly calls for swift global access to coronavirus vaccinations". UN News. 2020-05-06. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  6. "COVID-19 and multilateral governance at the United Nations between risk-prevention, procedural adaptation and feeble response". QIL QDI. 2020-06-19. Retrieved 2020-08-03.
  7. "Security Council Underlines Support for Secretary-General's Global Ceasefire Appeal, Fight against COVID-19, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2532 (2020) | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases". www.un.org. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  8. "Stalled Security Council resolution adopted, backing UN's global humanitarian ceasefire call". UN News. 2020-07-01. Retrieved 2020-08-01.