Lost Angels

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Lost Angels
LostangelsVHS.jpg
Theatrical Release Poster
Directed by Hugh Hudson
Produced by
Written byMichael Weller
Starring
Music by Philippe Sarde
Cinematography Juan Ruiz Anchía
Edited byDavid Gladwell
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date
  • May 5, 1989 (1989-05-05)
Running time
116 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$1.2 million (US)

Lost Angels (also known as The Road Home) is a 1989 independent film directed by Hugh Hudson and written by Michael Weller. It stars Donald Sutherland and Adam Horovitz. It was filmed in and around San Antonio, Texas. The film was entered into the 1989 Cannes Film Festival. [1]

Contents

Plot

Tim Doolan (Horovitz), a troubled youth from a broken home in Los Angeles, is sent to a private psychiatric hospital after an altercation with the police turns violent. In the hospital, he makes a connection with Dr. Charles Loftis (Sutherland), a man with issues of his own.

Cast

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References

  1. "Festival de Cannes: Lost Angels". festival-cannes.com. Archived from the original on 2011-09-17. Retrieved 2009-08-01.