AFI Catalog of Feature Films

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The AFI Catalog of Feature Films, [1] also known as the AFI Catalog [1] is an ongoing project by the American Film Institute to catalog all commercially made and theatrically exhibited American motion pictures, from the earliest days of the industry to the present. It began as a series of hardcover books known as The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures, [1] and subsequently became an online database exclusively.

Contents

Each entry in the catalog typically includes the film's title, physical description, production and distribution companies, production and release dates, personal credits, a plot summary, and notes on the film's history. The films are indexed by personal credits, production and distribution companies, year of release, and major and minor plot subjects.

To qualify for the "Feature Films" volumes, a film must have been commercially made by an American company, and given a theatrical release in 35 mm or larger gauge to the general public, with a running time of at least 40 minutes.

Publications

The hardcover volumes published:

The publication of the hardcover volumes was suspended due to budgetary reasons after volume F4 in 1997. Feature films released from 1951 through 1960, and from 1971 through 1993 have been cataloged only in the online database. The project estimates that additional years will be cataloged at six-month intervals. Film School students are offered the opportunity to provide plot synopses and original research, but input from other, experienced film researchers is not encouraged.

The project will also eventually catalog short films (beyond 1910) and newsreels.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "About the AFI Catalog of Feature Films". American Film Institute . Retrieved 2019-10-11.