Madelyn Pugh

Last updated
Madelyn Pugh
Born(1921-03-15)March 15, 1921
Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.
Died April 20, 2011(2011-04-20) (aged 90)
Santa Monica, California, U.S.
Other names Madelyn Pugh Davis, Madelyn Davis, Madelyn Martin
Occupation Television producer and writer
Years active 1951–2009
Spouse(s) Quinn Martin (1 child)
Richard Davis

Madelyn Pugh (March 15, 1921 April 20, 2011), sometimes credited as Madelyn Pugh Davis, Madelyn Davis, or Madelyn Martin, [1] was a television writer who became known in the 1950s for her work on the I Love Lucy television series.

<i>I Love Lucy</i> American television sitcom

I Love Lucy is an American television sitcom that originally ran on CBS from October 15, 1951, to May 6, 1957, with a total of 180 half-hour episodes spanning 6 seasons. The show starred Lucille Ball, her real-life husband Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley. It followed the life of Lucy Ricardo (Ball), a middle class housewife in New York City, who either concocted plans with her best friends to appear alongside her bandleader husband Ricky Ricardo (Arnaz) in his nightclub, or tried numerous schemes to mingle with, or be a part of show business. After the series ended in 1957, a modified version continued for three more seasons with 13 one-hour specials; it ran from 1957 to 1960. It was first known as The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show and later in reruns as The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour. Following the end of that, Ball divorced Arnaz and appeared in three other sitcoms into 1986.

Contents

Biography

Pugh was born in Indianapolis to I. Watt Pugh, a bank treasurer, [2] and Louise Huff. [3] She had two older sisters, Audrey and Rosalind. [2]

Indianapolis State capital and Consolidated city-county in the United States

Indianapolis, often shortened to Indy, is the state capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Indiana and the seat of Marion County. According to 2017 estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, the consolidated population of Indianapolis and Marion County was 872,680. The "balance" population, which excludes semi-autonomous municipalities in Marion County, was 863,002. It is the 16th most populous city in the U.S. The Indianapolis metropolitan area is the 34th most populous metropolitan statistical area in the U.S., with 2,028,614 residents. Its combined statistical area ranks 27th, with a population of 2,411,086. Indianapolis covers 368 square miles (950 km2), making it the 16th largest city by land area in the U.S.

Pugh became interested in writing while serving as co-editor of the Shortridge High School newspaper in Indianapolis, Indiana with classmate Kurt Vonnegut. She graduated from the Indiana University School of Journalism in 1942. Her first professional writing job was writing short radio spots for WIRE, an Indianapolis radio station.

Shortridge High School

Shortridge High School is a public high school located in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. Originally known as Indianapolis High School, it opened in 1864 and is the oldest public high school in the state of Indiana. Shortridge is the home of the International Baccalaureate and arts and humanities programs of the Indianapolis Public Schools district.(IPS). Out of 406 public high schools in Indiana, Shortridge was ranked as the 23rd best in 2018 by US News & World Report.

Kurt Vonnegut 20th-century American writer

Kurt Vonnegut Jr. was an American writer. In a career spanning over 50 years, Vonnegut published 14 novels, three short story collections, five plays, and five works of non-fiction, with further collections being published after his death. He is most famous for his darkly satirical, best-selling novel Slaughterhouse-Five (1969).

Indiana University university system, Indiana, U.S.

Indiana University (IU) is a multi-campus public university system in the state of Indiana, United States. Indiana University has a combined student body of more than 110,000 students, which includes approximately 46,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University Bloomington campus.

When her family moved to California, she got work as a radio writer, first for NBC and then CBS, where she met Bob Carroll. Pugh credits some of her breakthrough as "the girl writer" to the war effort, which limited the pool of qualified male writers. Early in her career, she was frequently the only female writer on staff.[ citation needed ]

Early in her career, as a staff writer for CBS Radio in Hollywood, Pugh forged a partnership with Bob Carroll, Jr. which lasted more than 50 years. Together they wrote some 400 television programs and roughly 500 radio shows. While the team was writing for The Steve Allen Show , they became interested in writing for Lucille Ball's new radio show, My Favorite Husband . They paid Allen to write his own show one week so they could focus on creating a script submission for My Favorite Husband . Under the supervision of head writer Jess Oppenheimer, the pair wrote Ball's radio program for its 2½ years. [4]

CBS Radio was a radio broadcasting company and radio network operator owned by CBS Corporation, and consolidated radio station groups owned by CBS and Westinghouse Broadcasting/Group W since the 1920s and Infinity Broadcasting since the 1970s. The broadcasting company was sold to Entercom on November 17, 2017.

<i>The Steve Allen Show</i> television series

The Steve Allen Show was an American variety show hosted by Steve Allen from June 1956 to June 1960 on NBC, from September 1961 to December 1961 on ABC, and in first-run syndication from 1962 to 1964.

Lucille Ball American actress, comedian and businesswoman

Lucille Désirée Ball was an American actress, comedian, model, entertainment studio executive and producer. She was the star of the self-produced sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy Show, Here's Lucy, and Life with Lucy, as well as comedy television specials aired under the title The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour.

Pugh and Carroll helped create a vaudeville act for Lucille Ball and her husband, Desi Arnaz, which became the basis for the pilot episode of I Love Lucy . Together with Oppenheimer and/or Bob Schiller and Bob Weiskopf, who joined the show at the beginning of the fifth year, the team tackled 39 episodes per season for the run of the series. Although they never won, Pugh and Carroll were nominated for three Emmy Awards for their work on the series. [5]

Vaudeville genre of variety entertainment in the United States and Canada from the early 1880s until the early 1930s

Vaudeville is a theatrical genre of variety entertainment born in France at the end of the 18th century. A vaudeville was originally a comedy without psychological or moral intentions, based on a comical situation: a kind of dramatic composition or light poetry, interspersed with songs or ballets. It became popular in the United States and Canada from the early 1880s until the early 1930s, but the idea of vaudeville's theatre changed radically from its French antecedent.

Desi Arnaz Cuban-born American musician, actor and television producer

Desiderio Alberto Arnaz y de Acha III, better known as Desi Arnaz, was a Cuban-born American actor, musician, and television producer. He is best remembered for his role as Ricky Ricardo on the American television series sitcom I Love Lucy. He co-starred on that show with dramatic and comedic actress Lucille Ball (1911–1989), to whom he was married at the time. He and Ball are generally credited as the innovators of the syndicated rerun, which they pioneered with the I Love Lucy series.

Robert Achille Schiller was an American screenwriter. He worked extensively with fellow producer/screenwriter Bob Weiskopf on numerous television shows in the United States, including I Love Lucy (1955–1957) and All in the Family (1977–1979) on the CBS network. For the latter series, he received an Emmy Award in 1978 as one of the writers of the episode "Cousin Liz."

Pugh and Carroll are credited with helping create the 'Lucy' character, which Ball played in one form or another for over 40 years. The pair also wrote episodes for The Lucy Show , Here's Lucy , The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show (aka The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour ) and Ball's final series, the unsuccessful Life With Lucy (1986).[ citation needed ]

The pair's other writing credits include work on the television series The Paul Lynde Show , Dorothy, Those Whiting Girls , Kocham Klane (an I Love Lucy series remake in Poland) and The Tom Ewell Show . They also worked on the films Forever, Darling and Yours, Mine and Ours , starring Ball. They created and wrote the Desi Arnaz Productions series The Mothers-in-Law (filmed at Desilu), which starred actresses Kaye Ballard and Eve Arden. The two served for seven years as executive producers of the long-running television series Alice and occasionally contributed scripts, one of which was awarded a Golden Globe Award. [1]

In September 2005, Madelyn Pugh Davis, who lived in California, released her memoirs, titled Laughing with Lucy, written with Bob Carroll, Jr.

Private life

Pugh was married twice. She married TV producer Quinn Martin on December 24, 1955 in Los Angeles. [6] They had a son, Michael Quinn Martin. She later married Richard Davis. [7]

Cover of Laughing with Lucy Madelyn Pugh Laughing with Lucy.jpg
Cover of Laughing with Lucy

Death

Pugh Davis died on April 20, 2011, aged 90, in Bel Air, California.[ citation needed ]

Bibliography

Awards

Madelyn Pugh Davis & Bob Caroll, Jr.

Madelyn Pugh Davis

Related Research Articles

William Clement Frawley was an American stage entertainer and screen and television actor best known for playing landlord Fred Mertz in the American television sitcom I Love Lucy and Bub in the television comedy series My Three Sons.

Desilu Productions American production company

Desilu Productions was an American production company founded and co-owned by husband and wife Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball, best known for shows such as I Love Lucy, Star Trek, and The Untouchables. Until 1962, Desilu was the second-largest independent television production company in the U.S., behind MCA's Revue Productions, until MCA bought Universal Pictures and Desilu became and remained the number-one independent production company, until being sold in 1967.

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Jess Oppenheimer Head writer, and producer of sitcom I Love Lucy.

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<i>The Lucy Show</i> American sitcom that aired on CBS from 1962–1968

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<i>Heres Lucy</i> television series

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<i>Life with Lucy</i> television series

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<i>My Favorite Husband</i>

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References

  1. 1 2 "Madelyn Pugh". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2016-03-06.
  2. 1 2 1930 United States Federal Census
  3. Indiana, Birth Certificates, 1907-1940
  4. "Bob and Madelyn profiles". Archived from the original on October 25, 2006. Retrieved October 30, 2006.
  5. "Madelyn Davis - Awards - IMDb". Poll.imdb.com. 2009-05-01. Retrieved 2016-03-06.
  6. California, Marriage Index, 1949-1959
  7. Dennis Hevesi, "Madelyn Pugh Davis, Writer for ‘I Love Lucy’, Dies at 90", The New York Times , April 21, 2011.
  8. "WIF awardees". Archived from the original on June 30, 2011. Retrieved April 10, 2013.