Mord Em'ly

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Mord Em'ly
Directed by George Pearson
Written by
Produced byGeorge Pearson
Starring
Production
company
Distributed by Jury Films
Release date
January 1922
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguagesSilent
English intertitles

Mord Em'ly is a 1922 British silent drama film directed by George Pearson and starring Betty Balfour, Rex Davis and Elsie Craven. [1] It was based on the 1898 novel of the same title by William Pett Ridge.

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References

  1. Low p.122

Bibliography