Moycarkey (electoral division)

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Outline map of North Tipperary, showing the boundaries of Moycarkey electoral division as they were at the time of the 2011 census MoycarkeyElectorDivision2011InTipperary.jpg
Outline map of North Tipperary, showing the boundaries of Moycarkey electoral division as they were at the time of the 2011 census

Moycarkey is an electoral division in County Tipperary in Ireland. It was originally an electoral division in the Thurles Poor Law Union in North Tipperary [1] [2] but is still used for various administrative purposes.

Contents

Extent of the electoral division

From the beginning, for reasons which are explained below, an electoral division which had the same name as a civil parish was not necessarily co-extensive with the civil parish. At the time of the 2011 census, the Moycarkey electoral division was co-extensive with the civil parish of the same name. [3] However, this may not have been the case in 1848; the properties listed in a poor law rate document [4] which is dated October 1948 and which seems to be about Moycarkey electoral division include several townlands that are not in Moycarky civil parish, specifically:

However, at the time of the 1911 census, the electoral division was co-extensive with the civil parish. The census returns for the division listed households [5] [6] exactly the townlands in the civil parish, showing that all of them except Smithsfarm which, probably because of its small size (just over 18 acres), did not contain any dwelling - indeed, none is shown on either this Ordnance Survey map or this one.

History

On 3 October 1848, Vernon Lanphier of Parkstown in Ballymoreen civil parish was elected as rate collector for Moycarkey electoral division of Thurles Poor Law Union. [7] Shortly thereafter, in 1849, the Poor Law Commissioners dissolved the Thurles Board of Guardians, using their power to dissolve any board that was "failing to provide sufficient funds, or to apply them efficiently in relieving the destitute" and to install their own officers. [8]

Statistics

The population of the division in the 1996 census was 520 and, in 2002, 533 (of which 271 were male and 262 female). [9]

Its population in 2011 was 549, of which males numbered 281 and females were 268. Probably a reflection of the immigration from Eastern Europe to Ireland which had happened in the so-called "Celtic Tiger" period, two of these residents had been born in Poland. The total housing stock was 197, of which 13 were vacant. [10]

Background

When, on the basis of the Poor Law Act (enacted on 31 July 1838), Ireland was divided into Poor Law Unions (by 1847 there were 130 unions, some of which were divided later so that, by 1864, there were 163 unions), the areas used for electing member of the boards of guardians were not, as in England and Wales, civil parishes; instead, electoral divisions were formed by the agglomeration of townlands.) The boundaries of these divisions were drawn by a Poor Law Boundary Commission, the aim being to produce areas of roughly equal rateable value and population. This meant that, while the divisions were almost always contiguous areas, they might have little relation to natural community boundaries. Similarly, the boundaries of the poor law unions themselves often had no relation to those of counties, baronies or civil parishes.[ citation needed ]

The boundaries of these electoral divisions have largely remained unchanged since the nineteenth century, so their populations vary widely, ranging from 32,305 for the electoral division of Blanchardstown-Blakestown in Fingal to 16 for the electoral divisions of Arigna in County Leitrim and Lackagh in North Tipperary (figures from the 2006 Census of Population). [11] The terms for these divisions has changed over time. Over time, it has become District Electoral Division but Section 23 of the Local Government Act, 1994, changed the term to just Electoral Division. There are 3,440 divisions in the republic and they are the smallest administrative area for which population statistics are published). [12]

Related Research Articles

County Tipperary County in Ireland

County Tipperary is a county in Ireland. It is located in the province of Munster. The county is named after the town of Tipperary, and was established in the early 13th century, shortly after the Norman invasion of Ireland. The population of the county was 159,553 at the 2016 census. The largest towns are Clonmel, Nenagh and Thurles.

North Tipperary Former County in Munster, Ireland

North Tipperary was a county in Ireland. It was part of the Mid-West Region and was also located in the province of Munster. It was named after the town of Tipperary and consisted of 48% of the land area of the traditional county of Tipperary. North Tipperary County Council was the local authority for the county. In 2011, the population of the county was 70,322. It was abolished on 3 June 2014, merged with South Tipperary under a new Tipperary County Council.

Electoral division (Ireland)

An electoral division is the smallest legally defined administrative areas in Ireland for which small area population statistics are published from the Census. There are a total of 3,440 electoral divisions in Ireland, with an average population of 1,447 and average area of 20.4 square kilometres. They are used to define local electoral areas for elections to county and city councils and to define constituencies in elections to Dáil Éireann. Until 1994, they were known as district electoral divisions (DED) in the county council areas and wards in the five county boroughs which were then in existence. Electoral divisions are local administrative units within the NUTS system of the European Union.

A poor law union was a geographical territory, and early local government unit, in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Irish Poor Laws Acts of Parliament to address poverty and social instability in Ireland

The Irish Poor Laws were a series of Acts of Parliament intended to address social instability due to widespread and persistent poverty in Ireland. While some legislation had been introduced by the pre-Union Parliament of Ireland prior to the Act of Union, the most radical and comprehensive attempt was the Irish act of 1838, closely modelled on the English Poor Law of 1834. In England, this replaced Elizabethan era legislation which had no equivalent in Ireland.

Civil parishes in Ireland Administrative division of Ireland

Civil parishes are units of territory in the island of Ireland that have their origins in old Gaelic territorial divisions. They were adopted by the Anglo-Norman Lordship of Ireland and then by the Elizabethan Kingdom of Ireland, and were formalised as land divisions at the time of the Plantations of Ireland. They no longer correspond to the boundaries of Roman Catholic or Church of Ireland parishes, which are generally larger. Their use as administrative units was gradually replaced by Poor Law Divisions in the 19th century, although they were not formally abolished. Today they are still sometimes used for legal purposes, such as to locate property in deeds of property registered between 1833 and 1946.

Parkstown townland in Munster, Ireland

Parkstown is a townland in County Tipperary in Ireland. Occupying 624 acres, it is located in the civil parish of Ballymoreen in the barony of Eliogarty in the poor law union of Thurles.

Moycarkey is a hamlet in North Tipperary, Ireland.

Moycarky

Moycarky or Moycarkey is a civil parish in County Tipperary, Ireland. It is one of 21 civil parishes in the barony of Eliogarty. Partly bounded by the River Suir, it has an area of 3554 statute acres and contains sixteen townlands:

Fertiana

Fertiana is a civil parish in County Tipperary, Ireland. It is part of the historical barony of Eliogarty. It has 3,397 statute acres divided into seven townlands:

Thurles Poor Law Union

Thurles Poor Law Union, which was officially declared on 28 March 1839, covered an area of 195 square miles, mostly in North Tipperary but also including some of South Tipperary. Although the boundaries of some poor law unions changed during the course of the 19th century, the Thurles union seems to have retained its original boundaries.

Thurles is a town in North Tipperary.

Thurles (civil parish)

Thurles is a civil parish in the barony of Eliogarty in County Tipperary.

Turtulla, Fertiana

Turtulla is a townland in the civil parish of Fertiana, County Tipperary. It is a little over 790 acres in extent and is bounded on its northern edge by the River Suir, which separates it from another, much smaller, townland of the same name, which belongs to Thurles civil parish.

Buolick, sometimes written as Boolick or Baolick, is an electoral division in County Tipperary in Ireland. It was originally an electoral division in the Thurles Poor Law Union but is still used for various administrative purposes.

Littleton (electoral division)

Littleton is an electoral division in County Tipperary in Ireland. The code number assigned it by the Central Statistics Office is 22071.

Twomileborris (electoral division)

Originally called Burris poor law electoral division, and sometimes called Borrisleigh in the past, this electoral division in County Tipperary in Ireland is now known as Twomileborris.

Rahelty (electoral division)

Rahealty, or Rahelty, is an electoral division in County Tipperary in Ireland.

Knockroe is a townland containing a little over 363 acres in Moycarky civil parish and in the ecclesiastical parish of Moycarkey, Littleton, Two-Mile-Borris, in County Tipperary, Ireland.

Garraun (Tipperary) Townland in Tipperary, Ireland

Garraun is a townland, containing a little over 567 acres, in Twomileborris civil parish in County Tipperary.

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