North Atlantic Squadron

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North Atlantic Squadron
North Atlantic Squadron, 1898.jpg
"Before the War" by Carlton T. Chapman, depicting the North Atlantic Squadron off Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 1898, just prior to the Spanish–American War.
Active1 November 1865 – 29 December 1902
CountryFlag of the United States (1896-1908).svg United States
BranchFlag of the United States Navy (1864-1959).svg United States Navy
Type Naval squadron
North Atlantic Fleet
Active29 December 1902 – 1 January 1906
CountryFlag of the United States (1896-1908).svg United States
BranchFlag of the United States Navy (1864-1959).svg United States Navy
Type Naval fleet

The North Atlantic Squadron was a section of the United States Navy operating in the North Atlantic. It was renamed as the North Atlantic Fleet in 1902. In 1905 the European and South Atlantic squadrons were abolished and absorbed into the North Atlantic Fleet. On 1 January 1906, the Navy's Atlantic Fleet was established by combining the North Atlantic Fleet with the South Atlantic Squadron.

Contents

Commanders-in-Chief

North Atlantic Squadron

North Atlantic Fleet

See also


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