Online Etymology Dictionary

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Online Etymology Dictionary
Online Etymology Dictionary.jpg
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Type of business Private
Type of site
Etymological dictionary
Available inEnglish
FoundedOnline (c. 2000)
Headquarters,
US
Key people
  • Douglas Harper, Founder
  • Dan McCormack, web design and coding
Employees1
Website www.etymonline.com
Alexa rankDecrease Positive.svg 19,319 (September 2016) [1]
Registrationno
Current statusactive

The Online Etymology Dictionary is a free online dictionary written and compiled by Douglas Harper that describes the origins of English-language words. [2]

Dictionary collection of words and their meanings

A dictionary, sometimes known as a wordbook, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically, which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc. or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon. It is a lexicographical reference that shows inter-relationships among the data.

Etymology Study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time

Etymology is the study of the history of words. By extension, the term "the etymology " means the origin of the particular word and for place names, there is a specific term, toponymy.

Contents

Description

Douglas Harper compiled the etymology dictionary to record the history and evolution of more than 30,000 words, including slang and technical terms. [3] The core body of its etymology information stems from Ernest Weekley's An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921). Other sources include the Middle English Dictionary and the Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology (by Robert Barnhart and others), although the sources for each entry are not stated. In producing his large dictionary, Harper says that he is essentially and for the most part a compiler, an evaluator of etymology reports which others have made. [4] Harper works as a Copy editor/Page designer for LNP Media Group. [5] [6]

Ernest Weekley British philologist

Ernest Weekley was a British philologist, best known as the author of a number of works on etymology. His An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921) has been cited as a source by most authors of similar books over the 90 years since it was published. From 1898 to 1938, he was Professor of Modern Languages at the University of Nottingham.

The Middle English Dictionary is a dictionary of Middle English published by the University of Michigan. "Its 15,000 pages offer a comprehensive analysis of lexicon and usage for the period 1100-1500, based on the analysis of a collection of over three million citation slips, the largest collection of this kind available."

Robert K. Barnhart was an American lexicographer and editor of various specialized dictionaries. He was co-editor, with his father Clarence Barnhart, on some editions of the Thorndike-Barnhart dictionaries and The World Book Dictionary. With his father and Sol Steinmetz, he edited the three volumes of The Barnhart Dictionary of New English.

As of June 2015, there were nearly 50,000 entries in the dictionary. [5]

Reviews and reputation

The Online Etymology Dictionary has been referenced by Oxford University's "Arts and Humanities Community Resource" catalog as "an excellent tool for those seeking the origins of words" [7] and cited in the Chicago Tribune as one of the "best resources for finding just the right word". [8] It is cited in academic work as a useful, though not definitive, reference for etymology. [9] [10] [11] In addition, it has been used as a data source for quantitative scholarly research. [12] [13]

<i>Chicago Tribune</i> major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper", it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region. It is the eighth-largest newspaper in the United States by circulation.

Related Research Articles

False cognates are pairs of words that seem to be cognates because of similar sounds and meaning, but have different etymologies; they can be within the same language or from different languages. For example, the English word dog and the Mbabaram word dog have exactly the same meaning and very similar pronunciations, but by complete coincidence. Likewise, English much and Spanish mucho which came by their similar meanings via completely different origins. This is different from false friends, which are similar-sounding words with different meanings, but which may in fact be etymologically related.

A false etymology, sometimes called folk etymology – although the last term is also a technical term in linguistics – is a popularly held but false belief about the origin or derivation of a specific word.

<i>Oxford English Dictionary</i> Premier historical dictionary of the English language

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world. The second edition, comprising 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, was published in 1989.

Wyrd Anglo-Saxon concept of personal fate or destiny

Wyrd is a concept in Anglo-Saxon culture roughly corresponding to fate or personal destiny. The word is ancestral to Modern English weird, which retains its original meaning only dialectically.

Chinglish

Chinglish is slang for spoken or written English language that is influenced by the Chinese language. In Hong Kong, Macau, Guangdong and Guangxi, the term "Chinglish" refers mainly to Cantonese-influenced English. This term is commonly applied to ungrammatical or nonsensical English in Chinese contexts, and may have pejorative or deprecating connotations. Other terms used to describe the phenomenon include "Chinese English", "China English", and "Sinicized English". The degree to which a Chinese variety of English exists or can be considered legitimate is disputed.

<i>Century Dictionary</i> book by William Dwight Whitney

The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia is one of the largest encyclopedic dictionaries of the English language. In its day it was compared favorably with the Oxford English Dictionary and frequently consulted for more factual information than would normally be the case for a dictionary.

Yo is an English slang interjection, commonly associated with American English. It was popularized by the Italian-American community in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the 1940s.

Folk etymology or reanalysis – sometimes called pseudo-etymology, popular etymology, or analogical reformation – is a change in a word or phrase resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar one. The form or the meaning of an archaic, foreign, or otherwise unfamiliar word is reanalyzed as resembling more familiar words or morphemes. Rebracketing is a form of folk etymology in which a word is broken down or "bracketed" into a new set of supposed elements. Back-formation, creating a new word by removing or changing parts of an existing word, is often based on folk etymology.

Adverbial genitive noun declined in the genitive case that functions as an adverb; found in Old and Middle English and German; modern English remnants include "always", "afterwards", "twice"

In grammar, an adverbial genitive is a noun declined in the genitive case that functions as an adverb.

These lists of English words of Celtic origin include English words derived from Celtic origins. These are, for example, Common Brittonic, Gaulish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, or other languages.

Wordnik, a nonprofit organization, is an online English dictionary and language resource that provides dictionary and thesaurus content. Some of the content is based on print dictionaries such as the Century Dictionary, the American Heritage Dictionary, WordNet, and GCIDE. Wordnik has collected a corpus of billions of words which it uses to display example sentences, allowing it to provide information on a much larger set of words than a typical dictionary. Wordnik uses as many real examples as possible when defining a word.

References

  1. "Alexa Ranking". Alexa Internet . Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  2. "Online Etymology Dictionary". Ohio University. 2003. Archived from the original on 2007-02-11. Retrieved 2007-01-05.
  3. "Home Page". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2006-12-31.
  4. The dictionary's principal sources appear at Sources @ Online Etymology Dictionary.
  5. 1 2 "Q&A With Douglas Harper: Creator of the Online Etymology Dictionary – IMSE – Journal". 18 June 2015. Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  6. "Contact Us". LancasterOnline. Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  7. "Online etymology dictionary". Arts and Humanities Community Resource. Oxford University . Retrieved 2018-03-22.
  8. Bierma, Nathan (2007-01-03). "Internet has best resources for finding just the right word". Chicago Tribune . Retrieved 2018-03-22.
  9. Paluzzi, Alessandro; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan; Torrenti, Matthew; Gardner, Paul (2012). "Retracing the etymology of terms in neuroanatomy". Clinical Anatomy . 25: 1005–1014. doi:10.1002/ca.22053.
  10. Hultgren, Anna Kristina (2013). "Lexical borrowing from English into Danish in the Sciences: An empirical investigation of 'domain loss'". International Journal of Applied Linguistics. 23: 166–182. doi:10.1111/j.1473-4192.2012.00324.x.
  11. Mair, Victor (2015-04-10). "Farsi shekar ast". Language Log . Retrieved 2018-03-23.
    Mair, Victor (2016-01-28). "'Butterfly' words as a source of etymological confusion". Language Log . Retrieved 2018-03-22.
  12. Lieberman, Erez; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Jackson, Joe; Tang, Tina; Nowak, Martin A. (2007). "Quantifying the evolutionary dynamics of language". Nature . 449: 713–716. doi:10.1038/nature06137. PMC   2460562 .
  13. Jatowt, Adam; Duh, Kevin (2014). "A framework for analyzing semantic change of words across time" (PDF). 2014 IEEE/ACM Joint Conference on Digital Libraries. doi:10.1109/JCDL.2014.6970173.