Per capita

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Per capita is a Latin prepositional phrase: per (preposition, taking the accusative case, meaning "by means of") and capita (accusative plural of the noun caput, "head"). The phrase thus means "by heads" or "for each head", i.e., per individual/person. The term is used in a wide variety of social sciences and statistical research contexts, including government statistics, economic indicators, and built environment studies.

An economic indicator is a statistic about an economic activity. Economic indicators allow analysis of economic performance and predictions of future performance. One application of economic indicators is the study of business cycles. Economic indicators include various indices, earnings reports, and economic summaries: for example, the unemployment rate, quits rate, housing starts, consumer price index, consumer leverage ratio, industrial production, bankruptcies, gross domestic product, broadband internet penetration, retail sales, stock market prices, and money supply changes.

It is commonly and usually used in the field of statistics in place of saying "per person" [1] (although per caput is the Latin for "per head" [2] ). It is also used in wills to indicate that each of the named beneficiaries should receive, by devise or bequest, equal shares of the estate. [2] This is in contrast to a per stirpes division, in which each branch (Latin stirps, plural stirpes) of the inheriting family inherits an equal share of the estate.

An academic discipline or academic field, also known as a field of study and branch of knowledge, is a subdivision of knowledge that is taught and researched at the college or university level. Disciplines are defined, and recognized by the academic journals in which research is published, and the learned societies and academic departments or faculties to which their practitioners belong. It includes scientific disciplines.

Statistics study of the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data

Statistics is a branch of mathematics dealing with data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation and presentation. In applying statistics to, for example, a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model process to be studied. Populations can be diverse topics such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics deals with all aspects of data, including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments. See glossary of probability and statistics.

A bequest is property given by will. Historically, the term bequest was used for personal property given by will and deviser for real property. Today, the two words are used interchangeably.

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<i>Illegitimi non carborundum</i>

Illegitimi non carborundum is a mock-Latin aphorism possibly read as "Don't let the bastards grind you down".

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Caput lupinum or caput gerat lupinum is a term used in the English legal system and its derivatives. The Latin term literally means "wolf's head" or "wolfish head", and refers to a person considered to be an outlaw, as in, e.g., the phrase caput gerat lupinum. Black's Law Dictionary, 8th edition reads "an outlawed felon considered a pariah – a lone wolf – open to attack by anyone." A person designated a caput lupinum was a criminal whose rights had been waived. As such, he or she could be legally harmed by any citizen.

References

  1. "Per capita | Define Per capita at Dictionary.com". Dictionary.reference.com. Retrieved 2017-04-08.
  2. 1 2 "Per caput, per capita." at The Economist style gluide. Retrieved 15 July 2017.