Pledge of Loyalty Act 2006

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Constitutional Amendment (Pledge of Loyalty) Act 2006
Coat of Arms of New South Wales.svg
Parliament of New South Wales
An Act to amend the Constitution Act 1902 to require Members of Parliament and Ministers to take a pledge of loyalty to Australia and to the people of New South Wales instead of swearing allegiance to the Queen, and to revise the oaths taken by Executive Councillors.
Enacted by Iemma Government
Date of royal assent 3 April 2006
Date commenced3 April 2006
Status: Repealed

The Constitution Amendment (Pledge of Loyalty) Act 2006 No 6, [1] was an Act to amend the Constitution Act 1902 to require Members of the New South Wales Parliament and its Ministers to take a pledge of loyalty to Australia and to the people of New South Wales instead of swearing allegiance to the Queen her heirs and successors, and to revise the oaths taken by Executive Councillors. The Act was assented to by the Queen on 3 April 2006.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Elizabeth II Queen of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms

Elizabeth II is Queen of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms.

Contents

Enactments

In the lead-up to the 2010 federal election, Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard stated her view that it would be appropriate for Australia to become a republic [2] only once Queen Elizabeth II's reign ends. [3] In 2006 the NSW parliament, the oldest and most senior of the Australian States, passed an Act to remove requirements for members of their Legislative Council and Executive Council to pledge allegiance to the Queen her heirs and successors. The oath was replaced with an oath of loyalty to Australia and to the people of New South Wales.

2010 Australian federal election general election

A federal election was held on Saturday, 21 August 2010 for members of the 43rd Parliament of Australia. The incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister Julia Gillard won a second term against the opposition centre-right Liberal Party of Australia led by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, after Labor formed a minority government with the support of three independent MPs and one Australian Greens MP.

Julia Gillard Australian politician and lawyer, 27th Prime Minister of Australia

Julia Eileen GillardAC is an Australian former politician who served as the 27th Prime Minister of Australia and Leader of the Australian Labor Party from 2010 to 2013. She was previously the 13th Deputy Prime Minister of Australia from 2007 until 2010 and held the cabinet positions of Minister for Education, Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations and Minister for Social Inclusion from 2007 to 2010. She was the first and to date only woman to hold the positions of Deputy Prime Minister, Prime Minister and leader of a major party in Australia.

Legislative Council

New South Wales Legislative Council Upper house of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Council, often referred to as the upper house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of the Australian state of New South Wales. The other is the Legislative Assembly. Both sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. It is normal for legislation to be first deliberated on and passed by the Legislative Assembly before being considered by the Legislative Council, which acts in the main as a house of review.

Executive Council

Attempted repeal

On 5 June 2012, the Constitution Amendment (Restoration of Oaths of Allegiance) Act 2012 No 33 [4] overruled the Constitution Amendment (Pledge of Loyalty) Act 2006 No 6. However, although the Act was consolidated as in force on 5 June 2012, this Act expired on 6 June 2012.[ citation needed ]

See also

The Perth Agreement is an agreement made by the prime ministers of the sixteen countries of the Commonwealth of Nations which retain the Westminster monarchical form of government. The Perth Agreement concerns amendments to the royal succession to the British Monarchy, whose institutions and legal framework are (largely) shared equally between Britain and the other Commonwealth realms. The changes, in summary, comprised replacing male-preference primogeniture ― under which male descendants take precedence over females in the line of succession ― with absolute primogeniture ; ending the disqualification of those who had married Roman Catholics; and limiting the number of individuals in line to the throne requiring permission from the Sovereign to marry. However, the ban on Catholics and other non-Protestants becoming Monarch and the requirement for the Sovereign to be in communion with the Church of England remained.

Royal Succession Bills and Acts

Royal Succession Bills and Acts are pieces of (proposed) legislation to determine the legal line of succession to the Monarchy of the United Kingdom.

Succession to the Throne Act, 2013 act of the Canadian Parliament adjusting the royal succession

The Succession to the Throne Act, 2013, which has the long title An Act to assent to alterations in the law touching the Succession to the Throne, was passed by the Parliament of Canada to give assent to the Succession to the Crown Bill, which was intended to change the line of succession to the Canadian throne and was passed with amendments by the UK parliament on 25 April 2013. Bill C-53 was presented and received its first reading in the House of Commons on 31 January 2013 and received Royal Assent on 27 March of the same year. The Act was brought into force by the Governor General-in-Council on 26 March 2015.

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References

  1. http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/nsw/num_act/caola2006n6460.pdf
  2. Jacob Saulwick (17 August 2010). "Once Queen goes, let's have a republic: Gillard". The Sydney Morning Herald.
  3. "Australia's Gillard backs republic after Queen's death". BBC World. 17 August 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2010.
  4. http://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/bills/docref/5a4ba5ae-dcd3-cc85-f210-d8c58d44b5f6