Port Phillip District

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Map of the District when its borders were defined in September 1839 Port Phillip District location map 1839.svg
Map of the District when its borders were defined in September 1839
Map of the "Southern or Port Phillip District" in 1840 for Crown Land sale purposes Port Phillip District location map 1840.svg
Map of the "Southern or Port Phillip District" in 1840 for Crown Land sale purposes

The Port Phillip District was an administrative division of the Colony of New South Wales from 9 September 1836 until 1 July 1851, when it was separated from New South Wales and became the Colony of Victoria.

In September 1836, NSW Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay declared Captain William Lonsdale the "Police Magistrate" of "the location of Settlers on the vacant Crown Lands adjacent to the shores of Port Phillip." This position was someone "of which all persons concerned are hereby required to take notice." [1]

In May 1839, Governor George Gipps defined the "Port Phillip District" as "The whole of the Lands comprised in the District lying to the south of the main range, between the Rivers Ovens and Goulburn, and adjacent to Port Phillip." [2] In July that year, Colonial Secretary E Deas Thomson announced that Charles La Trobe was the District's "Superintendent", [3] (which was later said by Governor Gipps "to have the powers of a Lieutenant Governor" [4] ).

On September 10, the District was announced in a government notice to be "all that part of the Territory of New South Wales which is bounded on the north by the thirty-sixth degree of south latitude; on the east by the one hundred and forty-sixth degree of east longitude, measuring from the meridian of Greenwich; on the south by the waters of Bass's Straits and the Pacific Ocean, and on the west by the one hundred and forty-first degree of east longitude, from the said meridian of Greenwich." [4] [5] [6] (141°E was the border with South Australia.)

In December 1840, for the purposes of government land sales, the northern border of the "Southern or Port Phillip District" was defined to follow the course of the Murray and Murrumbidgee Rivers, and from its source to the mouth of the Moruya River. [7] This coincided with the introduction of a fixed-price land sale scheme. [8] This did not change the boundaries of La Trobe's jurisdiction, [9] though all the Crown Land sold at that time was within that smaller area.

After extensive opposition in Sydney, including from the Legislative Council, thoughts about the bounds of the district that should be administered from Melbourne were retracted south to follow the Murray River alone. [8] [10]

On 30 July 1842, "An Act for the Government of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land" was passed, which defined electorates within those colonies. It included "that for the purposes of this Act the boundary of the District of Port Phillip on the North and North-east shall be a straight line drawn from Cape Howe to the nearest source of the River Murray, and thence the course of that River to the Eastern boundary of the Province of South Australia." [11] In January 1843, it was announced that the Town of Melbourne would have 1 representative in the soon-to-be formed NSW Parliament, while the remainder of the District of Port Phillip would have 5. [12] The polling places were to be in Melbourne, Geelong and Portland. [13]

On 28 February 1843, Governor Gipps proclaimed that the "Southern or Port Phillip District" for land disposal would now be defined as being the Counties of Bourke (Melbourne), Grant (Geelong) and Normanby (Portland). [14] These were the places within La Trobe's territory adjacent to the existing European settlement, and the location of any Crown Land to be sold.

On 1 July 1843, Governor Gipps proclaimed that La Trobe's jurisdiction was now the same as the newly formed electorate. [15] [6]

On 1 July 1851, the District was separated from New South Wales under provisions of the Australian Colonies Government Act 1850, and became the Colony of Victoria. This day would be celebrated for many years as "Separation Day."

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Charles La Trobe English-born Australian colonial administrator

Charles la Trobe, CB, commonly Latrobe, was appointed in 1839 superintendent of the Port Phillip District of New South Wales and, after the establishment in 1851 of the colony of Victoria, he became its first lieutenant-governor.

George Gipps British colonial administrator

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South Australia–Victoria border dispute Australian political dispute

The border between the Australian state of South Australia and what is today the State of Victoria was established in 1836 by imperial letters patent "as the 141st degree meridian of longitude east of Greenwich". In 1836 the land in what is now called Victoria was part of the colony of New South Wales, the original Victorian border was drawn between the colonies of South Australia and New South Wales. There was an error in establishing the position of the 141st meridian, and it took more than 75 years and a protracted legal dispute before the precise placement of the border was settled, resulting in the forfeiture of more than 1,300 km2 (500 sq mi) of territory from South Australia to Victoria.

The Port Phillip Association was formally formed in June 1835 to settle land in what would become Melbourne, which the association believed had been acquired by John Batman for the association from Wurundjeri elders after he had obtained their marks to a document, which came to be known as Batman's Treaty.

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William Lonsdale (colonist) Australian politician

William Lonsdale supervised the founding of the official settlement at Port Phillip from 1836 and went on to serve under the Superintendent La Trobe from 1839 to 1854.

William Thomas (Australian settler)

William Thomas represented Aboriginal people in various roles in the Port Phillip district in Australia.

Supreme Court of New South Wales for the District of Port Phillip

The Supreme Court of New South Wales for the District of Port Phillip was an historical division of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, exercising the jurisdiction of that court within the Port Phillip District of New South Wales. It consisted of a single Resident Judge. It existed from 1840 until 1852, when, following the separation of the Port Phillip District to form the Colony of Victoria, it was replaced by the Supreme Court of Victoria.

Charles Ebden Australian politician

Charles Hotson Ebden was an Australian pastoralist and politician, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council, the Victorian Legislative Council and the Victorian Legislative Assembly.

In August 1840, the Colonial Land and Emigration Commissioners of the British Government decided to allow the purchase of land anywhere in the Port Phillip District of New South Wales, Australia. Special Surveys could be requested to enable the purchase of 5,120 acres (2,070 ha), or eight square miles, for £1 per acre. This price was significantly below the value of the land at that time.

Electoral district of Port Phillip

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Charles Sievwright British army officer and Aboriginal Protector

Charles Wightman Sievwright was a British army officer before being appointed Assistant Protector of Aborigines in part of the Port Phillip District of the colony of New South Wales, now Victoria, Australia.

The 1848 New South Wales colonial election was held between 29 July and 2 August. No candidates were nominated for Port Phillip as a result of the campaign for independence from New South Wales, and a fresh writ was issued for an election on 3 October.

<i>Victoria Government Gazette</i> Government gazette of Victoria, Australia

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References

  1. "PORT PHILLIP. - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900) - 14 Sep 1836". New South Wales Government Gazette. 14 September 1836. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  2. "PROCLAMATION". New South Wales Government Gazette. 22 May 1839. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  3. "Government Gazette Appointments and Employment". New South Wales Government Gazette. 31 July 1839. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  4. 1 2 "PROCLAMATION". New South Wales Government Gazette. 9 February 1841. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  5. Thomson, E Deas (11 September 1836). Documenting a Democracy(PDF) https://www.foundingdocs.gov.au/resources/transcripts/vic2_doc_1839.pdf.{{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. 1 2 "What is the northern boundary of Victoria?". The Age. 21 April 1906. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 26 April 2009.
  7. "LAND REGULATIONS". New South Wales Government Gazette. 9 December 1840. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  8. 1 2 Shaw, A. G. L. (June 1982). "Agitation for the Separation of the Port Phillip District from the Colony of New South Wales, 1838–1850". Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society. Sydney: Royal Australian Historical Society. 68 (1): 1–17. ISSN   0035-8762.
  9. "PROCLAMATION". New South Wales Government Gazette. 9 February 1841. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  10. Shaw, A. G. L. (1996). A History of the Port Phillip District: Victoria Before Separation. Carlton South, Victoria: The Miegunyah Press. ISBN   0-522-84651-3.
  11. "CAP. LXXVI. An Act for the Government of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. [30th July, 1842.]". New South Wales Government Gazette. 5 January 1843. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  12. "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette. 6 January 1843. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  13. "PROCLAMATION". New South Wales Government Gazette. 5 May 1843. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  14. "PROCLAMATION. - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900) - 28 Feb 1843". New South Wales Government Gazette. 28 February 1843. Retrieved 24 January 2022.
  15. "PROCLAMATION". New South Wales Government Gazette. 1 July 1843. Retrieved 24 January 2022.

Further reading