Revolution (Tomorrow song)

Last updated
"Revolution"
Single by Tomorrow
from the album Tomorrow
A-side "Revolution"
B-side "Three Jolly Little Dwarves" (Hopkins/Burgess)
ReleasedAugust 1967 [1]
Format 7"
Recorded1967
Genre Psychedelic rock
Length3:48
Label Parlophone
Songwriter(s) Keith Hopkins, Steve Howe
Producer(s) Mark Wirtz
Tomorrow singles chronology
"My White Bicycle"
(1967)
"Revolution"
(1967)

"Revolution" is a song by the English psychedelic rock band Tomorrow. It was first released as a single in the UK by Parlophone in September 1967, and on the group's self-titled album Tomorrow in February 1968. The song is credited to Keith Alan Hopkins (better known as Keith West) and Steve Howe. Though Tomorrow's song was not a hit, the group was well known to insiders of the London music scene.[ who? ][ citation needed ]

Psychedelic rock Style of rock music

Psychedelic rock is a diverse style of rock music inspired, influenced, or representative of psychedelic culture, which is centred around perception-altering hallucinogenic drugs. The music is intended to replicate and enhance the mind-altering experiences of psychedelic drugs, most notably LSD. Many psychedelic groups differ in style, and the label is often applied spuriously.

Tomorrow were a 1960s psychedelic rock, pop and freakbeat band. Despite critical acclaim and support from DJ John Peel who featured them on his "Perfumed Garden" radio show, the band was not a great success in commercial terms. They were among the first psychedelic bands in England along with Pink Floyd and Soft Machine. Tomorrow recorded the first ever John Peel show session on BBC Radio 1 on 21 September 1967.

Parlophone German-British record label

Parlophone Records Limited is a German-British major record label founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company as Parlophon. The British branch of the label was founded in 8 August 1923 as The Parlophone Company Limited , which developed a reputation in the 1920s as a jazz record label. On 5 October 1926, the Columbia Graphophone Company acquired Parlophone's business, name, logo, and release library, and merged with the Gramophone Company on 31 March 1931 to become Electric & Musical Industries Limited (EMI). George Martin joined Parlophone in 1950 as assistant label manager, taking over as manager in 1955. Martin produced and released a mix of product, including comedy recordings of The Goons, pianist Mrs Mills, and teen idol Adam Faith.

Tomorrow's September 1967 single was likely the prime inspiration for the John Lennon song "Revolution" which was released a year later.[ citation needed ] Tomorrow's tongue in cheek lyric "Have your own little revolution, NOW!" sounds like it prompted Lennon's response "You say you want a revolution."[ citation needed ]

John Lennon English singer and songwriter, founding member of The Beatles

John Winston Ono Lennon was an English singer, songwriter and peace activist who co-founded the Beatles, the most commercially successful band in the history of popular music. He and fellow member Paul McCartney formed a much-celebrated songwriting partnership. Along with George Harrison and Ringo Starr, the group achieved worldwide fame during the 1960s. In 1969, Lennon started the Plastic Ono Band with his second wife, Yoko Ono, and he continued to pursue a solo career following the Beatles' break-up in April 1970.

Revolution (Beatles song) original song written and composed by Lennon-McCartney

"Revolution" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles, written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. Three versions of the song were recorded in 1968, all during sessions for the Beatles' self-titled double album, also known as "the White Album": a slow, bluesy arrangement that would make the final cut for the LP; an abstract sound collage that originated as the latter part of "Revolution 1" and appears on the same album; and the faster, hard rock version similar to "Revolution 1", released as the B-side of the "Hey Jude" single. Although the single version was issued first, it was recorded several weeks after "Revolution 1", as a remake specifically intended for release as a single.

Several different recordings of the song have been released by Tomorrow. The 1999 CD re-issue of their album also includes a previously unreleased studio demo recording of the song. This version does not have the orchestral overdubs but instead has some phasing effects not heard in the later recording. Both were recorded at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London in mid 1967. Tomorrow performed this song for John Peel's radio show on the BBC, and there is also a live recording on the album 50 Minute Technicolor Dream .

A phaser is an electronic sound processor used to filter a signal by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the peaks and troughs of the waveform being affected is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect. For this purpose, phasers usually include a low-frequency oscillator.

Abbey Road Studios recording studio in London, England

Abbey Road Studios is a recording studio at 3 Abbey Road, St John's Wood, City of Westminster, London, England. It was established in November 1931 by the Gramophone Company, a predecessor of British music company EMI, which owned it until Universal Music took control of part of EMI in 2013.

John Peel English disc jockey, radio presenter, record producer and journalist

John Robert Parker Ravenscroft,, known professionally as John Peel, was an English disc jockey, radio presenter, record producer and journalist. He was the longest serving of the original BBC Radio 1 DJs, broadcasting regularly from 1967 until his death in 2004.

AllMusic writer Richie Unterberger called "Revolution" an "infectious hippie anthem". [2]

AllMusic Online music database

AllMusic is an online music database. It catalogs more than 3 million album entries and 30 million tracks, as well as information on musical artists and bands. It launched in 1991, predating the World Wide Web.

Hippie Member of the counterculture of the 1960s

A hippie is a member of the counterculture of the 1960s, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word hippie came from hipster and was used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City's Greenwich Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district. The term hippie first found popularity in San Francisco with Herb Caen, who was a journalist for the San Francisco Chronicle.

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Keith Hopkins, known by his stage name Keith West, is a British rock singer, songwriter and music producer. West is a solo artist and also the lead singer of various groups including Tomorrow, a 1960s psychedelic rock band. West wrote most of his own songs, often in collaboration with Ken Burgess. Despite critical acclaim and support from BBC Radio 1 DJ John Peel, who featured Tomorrow on his Perfumed Garden show, the group was not a major commercial success.

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-11-16. Retrieved 2007-12-10.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. https://www.allmusic.com/album/tomorrow-mw0000247533