Richard Gibbs (Canadian football)

Last updated
Dick Gibbs
Born:c. 1945 (age 7576)
Oak Park, Illinois, U.S.
Career information
CFL status American
Position(s) HB
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight187 lb (85 kg)
College Iowa
Career history
As player
1967 Hamilton Tiger-Cats
Career highlights and awards
  • Grey Cup champion (1967)

Richard Gibbs (born c. 1945) was a Canadian and American football player who played for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. He won the Grey Cup with them in 1967. [1] He previously played college football at the University of Iowa (winning letters in 1965 and 1966) [2] and lived in Chariton, Iowa. He was selected in the 1967 NFL draft by the San Francisco Giants in Round 13.

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