Ronnie Scott (songwriter)

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Ronnie Scott was a British pop music promoter, group manager and songwriter; known primarily for hit songs co-written with Marty Wilde in the 1960s, and Steve Wolfe in the 1970s. [1]

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea separates Great Britain and Ireland. The United Kingdom's 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Pop music is a genre of popular music that originated in its modern form in the United States and United Kingdom during the mid-1950s. The terms "popular music" and "pop music" are often used interchangeably, although the former describes all music that is popular and includes many diverse styles. "Pop" and "rock" were roughly synonymous terms until the late 1960s, when they became increasingly differentiated from each other.

A songwriter is a professional that writes lyrics and composes musical compositions for songs. A songwriter can also be called a composer, although the latter term tends to be used mainly for individuals from the classical music genre and film scoring, but is also associated writing and composing the original musical composition or musical bed. A songwriter that writes the lyrics/words are referred to as lyricist. The pressure from the music industry to produce popular hits means that songwriting is often an activity for which the tasks are distributed between a number of people. For example, a songwriter who excels at writing lyrics might be paired with a songwriter with the task of creating original melodies. Pop songs may be written by group members from the band or by staff writers – songwriters directly employed by music publishers. Some songwriters serve as their own music publishers, while others have outside publishers.

Contents

With Marty Wilde

In 1966, Scott was working for The George Cooper Agency, whose artists roster included The Bystanders (who Scott also managed) and Marty Wilde. [2] Scott wrote a number of songs, some on his own, but most co-written with Wilde, demos of which were recorded by The Bystanders. One solo effort "Royal Blue Summer Sunshine Day" (1967) and two joint efforts "Have I Offended The Girl" (1966) and "When Jesamine Goes" (published under the pseudonyms of Frere Manston and Jack Gellar) (1968) were issued as singles, but all failed. [3] The Casuals covered the last song and issued it simply as "Jesamine", which reached #2 in the UK Singles Chart in late 1968. [4]

Demo (music) song or group of songs recorded for limited circulation or reference use rather than for general public release

A demo is a song or group of songs recorded for limited circulation or reference use rather than for general public release. A demo is a way for a musician to approximate their ideas in a fixed format, such as cassette tape, compact disc, or digital audio files, and to thereby pass along those ideas to record labels, producers, or other artists.

A pseudonym or alias is a name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which can differ from their first or true name (orthonym). The term is not used when a new name entirely replaces an individual's own.

For the American doo-wop trio see Original Casuals

Scott and Wilde songs were used by a wide range of musicians including Status Quo: "Ice in the Sun" "Elizabeth Dreams" and "Paradise Flat" (all on their first album Picturesque Matchstickable Messages from the Status Quo ); Lulu "I'm a Tiger" (1968) and Wilde himself with "Abergavenny" (1968) (also credited to Manston and Gellar, and reissued by Wilde under the pseudonym "Shannon" in 1969)

Status Quo (band) English rock band

Status Quo are an English rock band who play boogie rock. The group originated in The Spectres, founded by Francis Rossi and Alan Lancaster in 1962, while still schoolboys. After a number of lineup changes, which included the introduction of Rick Parfitt in 1967, the band became The Status Quo in 1967 and Status Quo in 1969.

"Ice in the Sun" is a song by the band Status Quo. The track was recorded in 1968, and appeared on Picturesque Matchstickable Messages from the Status Quo, an album by Status Quo that was released in August that year.

<i>Picturesque Matchstickable Messages from the Status Quo</i> 1968 studio album by Status Quo

Picturesque Matchstickable Messages from the Status Quo is the debut studio album by the English rock band Status Quo, released in September 1968. It features several covers, including "Green Tambourine" by The Lemon Pipers.

Wilde and Scott also wrote the words and music to The Wednesday Play version of No Trams to Lime Street an Alun Owen play, broadcast on 18 March 1970. [5]

<i>The Wednesday Play</i> television series

The Wednesday Play is an anthology series of British television plays which ran on BBC1 from October 1964 to May 1970. The plays were usually written for television, although adaptations from other sources also featured. The series gained a reputation for presenting contemporary social dramas, and for bringing issues to the attention of a mass audience that would not otherwise have been discussed on screen.

No Trams to Lime Street is a 1959 British television play, written by the Welsh playwright Alun Owen for the Armchair Theatre anthology series. Produced by the Associated British Corporation (ABC) for transmission on the ITV network, the play was broadcast on 18 October 1959. The original version no longer exists.

Alun Davies Owen was a Welsh screenwriter and actor predominantly active in television. However, he is best remembered by a wider audience for writing the screenplay of The Beatles' debut feature film A Hard Day's Night (1964), which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.

When The Bystanders evolved into Man, Scott remained their manager, and they recorded up to three demo sessions a week for him, including "Down the Dustpipe" which Scott suggested to Status Quo when they asked for his help. [6] Man left Scott's management in 1969.

Man are a rock band from South Wales whose style is a mixture of American West Coast psychedelia, progressive rock, and blues. Formed in November 1968 as a reincarnation of Welsh rock harmony group the Bystanders, Man are renowned for the extended jams in their live performances.

"Down the Dustpipe" is a song written by Australian singer-songwriter Carl Groszmann. He was a client of Valley Music, who were affiliated to Status Quo’s management in their early days. The group recorded it, and in Francis Rossi’s words, "it was the first record to feature our soon-to-be trademark boogie shuffle". It became one of the most popular numbers in their live set. Released as a single in March 1970, it took the media by surprise as it was so different in sound from their previous work. Radio 1 presenter Tony Blackburn dismissed it on air the first time he played it with the comment, "Down the dustbin for this one."

With Steve Wolfe

By 1976 Scott was working with Steve Wolfe as a songwriting and producing team, when they spotted Bonnie Tyler in "The Townsman Club" in Swansea, Wales, and they became Tyler's managers, songwriters, and producers. [7]

Bonnie Tyler Welsh singer

Bonnie Tyler (born Gaynor Hopkins; 8 June 1951) is a Welsh singer, known for her distinctive husky voice. Tyler came to prominence with the release of her 1977 album The World Starts Tonight and its singles "Lost in France" and "More Than a Lover". Her 1978 single "It's a Heartache" reached number four on the UK Singles Chart, and number three on the US Billboard Hot 100.

Swansea City & County in Wales

Swansea is a coastal city and county, officially known as the City and County of Swansea in Wales. Swansea lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan and the ancient Welsh commote of Gŵyr on the southwest coast. The county area includes Swansea Bay and the Gower Peninsula. Swansea is the second largest city in Wales and the twenty-fifth largest city in the United Kingdom. According to its local council, the City and County of Swansea had a population of 241,300 in 2014, the second most populous local authority area in Wales after Cardiff. Together with Neath and Port Talbot, Swansea formed a wider Urban Area of 300,352 in 2011.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Scott and Wolfe wrote eight out of the ten songs on Tyler's first album The World Starts Tonight (1977), which they also produced. The album included "Lost in France", which reached #9 on the UK Singles Chart, and "More Than a Lover" which reached #27. [8]

Tyler's second album Natural Force (released as It's a Heartache in the US) (1978) included five Scott/Wolfe songs including the track "It's a Heartache" which reached #4 in the UK, [8] and #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, although it had already been recorded and published by Juice Newton in 1977. This song has since been covered by several different musicians, including Dave & Sugar, Trick Pony, and Rod Stewart.

Scott and Wolfe wrote eight of the ten songs on Tyler's Diamond Cut album (1979), and also six of the ten songs on her Goodbye to the Island album (1981), including "Sitting on the Edge of the Ocean", which won the "Grand Prix" at the 1979 World Popular Song Festival in Japan.

Bonnie Tyler did not renew her contract with Scott and Wolfe, since she perceived that they "were trying to take her further into country music". [7]

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References

  1. Chartwatch list of Scott's Top 10 records Retrieved 17 September 2009
  2. Allmusic biography of The Bystanders, by Richie Unterberger Retrieved 17 September 2009
  3. Sleevenotes by Nigel Lees to "Shapes and Sounds 2 - Shades of Deepest Purple from the BBC Archives 1967-1971" - Top Sounds TSSCD 003 (2008)
  4. Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 97. ISBN   1-904994-10-5.
  5. Radio Times article by Elizabeth Cowley, 12 March 1970, in Startrader history of the Wednesday Play Retrieved 17 September 2009
  6. Leonard, Deke (1996). Rhinos, Winos & Lunatics: The legend of Man a rock'n'roll band (1st ed.). Borden, Hants: Northdown Publishing Ltd. p. 18. ISBN   1-900711-00-1.
  7. 1 2 Bonnie Tyler Official Biography Archived 2009-10-15 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 17 September 2009
  8. 1 2 Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 572. ISBN   1-904994-10-5.