Sire

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Sire is a respectful form of address for reigning kings in Europe. It is used in Belgium, France, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

The words "sire" and "sir", as well as the French "(mon)sieur" and the Spanish "señor", share a common etymological origin, all ultimately being related to the Latin senior . The female equivalent form of address is dame or dam. [1]

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Sire is a form of address for reigning kings in the United Kingdom and in Belgium.

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References

  1. Jane Mills (April 1992). Womanwords: a dictionary of words about women. Free Press. p. 62. ISBN   978-0-02-921495-4.