Steinbach Hawks

Last updated
Steinbach Hawks
City Steinbach, Manitoba
League Manitoba Junior Hockey League
Operated 1985-1988
Home arena Steinbach Centennial Arena

The Steinbach Hawks were a Canadian junior 'A' ice hockey team based in Steinbach, Manitoba that played in the Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL) from 1985 to 1988. [1]

Canadians citizens of Canada

Canadians are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, several of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Steinbach, Manitoba City in Manitoba, Canada

Steinbach is a city located about 58 km south-east of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. According to the Canada 2016 Census, Steinbach has a population of 15,829, making it the third-largest city in Manitoba and the largest community in the Eastman region. The city is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Hanover, and the Rural Municipality of La Broquerie (east). The name of "Steinbach" is translated from German as "Stony Brook" and was first settled by Plautdietsch-speaking Mennonites from the Russian Empire in 1874. The city continues to have a strong Mennonite influence today; more than 50 percent of the residents claim Germanic heritage. Steinbach is found on the eastern edge of the Canadian Prairies, while Sandilands Provincial Forest is a short distance east of the city.

Contents

After only three seasons in the MJHL, the Hawks took leave of absence following the 1987-1988 season and formally ceased operations two years later. The league added the Winnipeg-based Southeast Thunderbirds for the 1988-1989 season to counter the loss of the Hawks. [2] That team relocated to Steinbach in 2009 to become the Steinbach Pistons. [3]

Winnipeg Provincial capital city in Manitoba, Canada

Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba in Canada. Centred on the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, it is near the longitudinal centre of North America, approximately 110 kilometres (70 mi) north of the Canada–United States border.

Steinbach Pistons

The Steinbach Pistons are a Junior "A" ice hockey team from Steinbach, Manitoba, Canada. They are members of the Manitoba Junior Hockey League, which is a member of the Canadian Junior Hockey League.

Season-by-season record

Note: GP = Games Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, OTL = Overtime Losses, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

SeasonGP W L T OTLGF GA PointsFinishPlayoffs
1985-86 48 14 34 0 - 231 338 28 7th MJHL Lost Quarter-final
1986-87 48 14 33 1 - 272 320 29 8th MJHL Lost Quarter-final
1987-88 48 11 36 1 - 258 388 23 9th MJHL DNQ

Playoffs

Winkler Flyers defeated Steinbach Hawks 4-games-to-none
St. Boniface Saints defeated Steinbach Hawks 4-games-to-none

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The 2012–13 season was the Manitoba Junior Hockey League's (MJHL) 96th season of operation.

The 2009–10 season was the Manitoba Junior Hockey League's (MJHL) 93rd season of operation.

References

  1. Prest, Ashley (15 April 2009). "Blades cut ties with Beausejour for Steinbach". Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved 3 March 2016.
  2. Lunney, Doug (18 April 2013). "Steinbach Pistons Pumped". Winnipeg Sun. Retrieved 3 March 2016.
  3. "Blades take drive to MJHL's 'Motor City'". PembinaValleyToday.ca. 29 April 2009. Retrieved 3 March 2016.