Stephen Holden

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Stephen Holden
Born (1941-07-18) July 18, 1941 (age 78)
Nationality American
Occupation Writer, critic, poet

Stephen Holden (born July 18, 1941) is an American writer, music critic, film critic, and poet. [1] [2]

Contents

Biography

Holden earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Yale University in 1963. He worked as a photo editor, staff writer, and eventually became an A&R executive for RCA Records [2] before turning to writing pop music reviews and related articles for Rolling Stone magazine, Blender , The Village Voice , The Atlantic , and Vanity Fair , among other publications. He first achieved prominence with his 1970s Rolling Stone work, where he tended to cover singer-songwriter and traditional pop artists. He joined the staff of The New York Times in 1981, and subsequently became one of the newspaper's leading theatre and film critics.

Yale University Private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Yale consistently ranks among the top universities in the world.

RCA Records is an American record label owned by Sony Music, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America. It is one of Sony Music's four flagship labels, alongside RCA's former long-time rival Columbia Records, Arista Records, and Epic Records. The label has released multiple genres of music, including pop, classical, rock, hip hop, afrobeat, electronic, R&B, blues, jazz, and country. Its name is derived from the initials of its defunct parent company, the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). It was fully acquired by Bertelsmann in 1986, making it a part of Bertelsmann Music Group (BMG); however, RCA Records became a part of Sony BMG Music Entertainment, a merger between BMG and Sony Music, in 2004, and was acquired by the latter in 2008, after the dissolution of Sony BMG and the restructuring of Sony Music. It is the second oldest record label in American history, after sister label Columbia Records.

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Holden's experiences as a journalist and executive with RCA led him to write the satirical novel Triple Platinum, [2] which was published by Dell Books in 1980. He is the recipient of the 1986 Grammy Award for Best Album Notes for The Voice: The Columbia Years , a Frank Sinatra anthology. His poetry has been featured in The New Yorker and is included in the anthology The New Yorker Book of Poems.

The Grammy Award for Best Album Notes has been presented since 1964. From 1973 to 1976, a separate award was presented for Best Album Notes – Classical. Those awards are listed under those years below. The award recognizes albums with excellent liner notes. It is presented to the liner notes author or authors, not to the artists or performers on the winning work, except if the artist is also the liner notes author.

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Holden has appeared on 60 Minutes , 20/20 , and Entertainment Tonight , [1] and has provided commentaries on National Public Radio. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Stephen Holden". The New York Times . The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved May 3, 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 "Stephen Holden On 'Song Travels'". NPR . December 27, 2013. Retrieved May 3, 2019.
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