Thai Global Network

Last updated
TGN
Thai TV Global Network.jpg
CountryThailand
Broadcast areaInternational
Programming
Language(s)Thai, English
Picture format576i (Standard)
Ownership
Owner Royal Thai Army Radio and Television Channel 5
History
Launched1 January 1998;24 years ago (1998-01-01)
Links
Website Thai TV Global

Thai TV Global Network (TGN) is a Thai satellite television channel. Тhai TV Global Network is the first and only satellite TV broadcasting center in Thailand. TGN, under the operation of the Royal Thai Army Radio and Television Channel 5, provides 24-hour-programs broadcasting to 170 countries on five continents. All facets of Thai life, culture, activities, information, news and entertainment are included in the programming for the channel.

Contents

TGN reaches an audience of 350 million viewers around the world.

Programming on the channel includes game shows, reports about the royal house of the Chakri dynasty, news, Thai music videos, soap operas, cooking shows (some in English), and Thai boxing known as Muay Thai.

Reception

Thailand

UBC channel 179 ** 500 ** cable operators as a member of the Thailand Cable TV Association' Independent cable networks **

Worldwide

also available on Galaxy 19 at 97 west

History

The pay TV station Thai Wave started via satellite in 1996. At the beginning, the station featured Thai video clips from Thailand, as well as news and soap operas. The station broadcast daily from 8 pm to 4 am. [1] The program was promoted in Europe by THAI WAVE International Broadcasting Co. Ltd., Hauptstr. 100, 76461 Muggensturm, Germany. The use of Thai Wave analogue Decoding from this period was same as Premiere and Canal +, special was the "white key" that had to be used in decoders to decode the program. [2] After about a year, Thai Wave ended operation due to the low demand. The home of the station was in Phaya Thai, a Khet (district) of Bangkok and it was used the studio and program content from Royal Thai Army Radio and Television Channel 5. Later Thai TV Global Network started operation by digital satellite broadcasting.

Related Research Articles

Telecommunications in Egypt Overview of telecommunications in Egypt

Egypt has long been the cultural and informational centre of the Middle East and North Africa, and Cairo is the region's largest publishing and broadcasting centre.

Digital Video Broadcasting Open standard for digital television broadcasting

Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a set of international open standards for digital television. DVB standards are maintained by the DVB Project, an international industry consortium, and are published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of the European Telecommunications Standardisé Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) and European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

ATSC standards American set of standards for digital television

Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) standards are an American set of standards for digital television transmission over terrestrial, cable and satellite networks. It is largely a replacement for the analog NTSC standard and, like that standard, is used mostly in the United States, Mexico, Canada, and South Korea. Several former NTSC users, in particular Japan, have not used ATSC during their digital television transition, because they adopted their own system called ISDB.

Digital terrestrial television is a technology for terrestrial television in which land-based (terrestrial) television stations broadcast television content by radio waves to televisions in consumers' residences in a digital format. DTTV is a major technological advance over the previous analog television, and has largely replaced analog which had been in common use since the middle of the 20th century. Test broadcasts began in 1998 with the changeover to DTTV beginning in 2006 and is now complete in many countries. The advantages of digital terrestrial television are similar to those obtained by digitising platforms such as cable TV, satellite, and telecommunications: more efficient use of limited radio spectrum bandwidth, provision of more television channels than analog, better quality images, and potentially lower operating costs for broadcasters.

Free-to-air (FTA) services are television (TV) and radio services broadcast in clear (unencrypted) form, allowing any person with the appropriate receiving equipment to receive the signal and view or listen to the content without requiring a subscription, other ongoing cost, or one-off fee. In the traditional sense, this is carried on terrestrial radio signals and received with an antenna.

FashionTV Television কে এইচ কে ফ‍্যাশন টিভি channel

FashionTV is an international fashion and lifestyle broadcasting television channel. Founded in France in 1997, by its Polish-born president Michel Adam Lisowski, FashionTV is a widely distributed satellite channels in the world with 31 satellite and 2,000 cable systems. As of 2014, it had 400 million views all over the world.

Television in Germany began in Berlin on 22 March 1935, broadcasting for 90 minutes three times a week. It was home to the first public television station in the world, named Fernsehsender Paul Nipkow. The German television market had approximately 36.5 million television households in 2000, making it the largest television market in Europe. Nowadays, 95% of German households have at least one television receiver. All the main German TV channels are free-to-air.

Mass media in Cambodia

Media in Cambodia is vibrant and largely unregulated. This situation has led to the establishment of numerous radio, television and print media outlets. Many private sector companies have moved into the media sector, which represents a significant change from many years of state-run broadcasting and publishing.

Television in Bulgaria was introduced in 1959. Although the Bulgarian media market is small, it is one of the most vibrant and highly competitive in Central and Eastern Europe. Global players such as News Corporation, Modern Times Group, Central European Media Enterprises, Fox Broadcasting Company and others operate the biggest and most popular media outlets in the country.

The Netherlands now has three major forms of broadcast digital television. Terrestrial (DVB-T), Cable (DVB-C), and Satellite (DVB-S). In addition IPTV services are available. At the end of the first quarter of 2013 almost 84% of the households in the Netherlands had some form of digital television.

Television in Belgium was introduced in 1953 and began with one channel each in Dutch and French. The country is heavily cabled, with 93% of households watching television through cable as of 2003.

Television in Indonesia Overview of television in Indonesia

Television in Indonesia started in 1962, when the then state-run station TVRI began broadcasting – the third country in Southeast Asia to do so. TVRI held a television monopoly in Indonesia until 1989 when the first commercial station, RCTI began as a local station and was subsequently granted a national license a year later. The Indonesian television is regulated by both Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (Kemenkominfo) and Indonesian Broadcasting Commission (KPI).

Television is the most popular medium in Russia, with 74% of the population watching national television channels routinely and 59% routinely watching regional channels. There are 3300 television channels in total. Before going digital television, 3 channels have a nationwide outreach : Channel One, Russia-1 and NTV.

Television in Croatia was first introduced in 1956. As of 2012 there are 10 nationwide and 21 regional DVB-T television channels, and more than 30 other channels either produced in the Republic of Croatia or produced for the Croatian market and broadcast via IPTV, cable or satellite television. The electronic communications market in Croatia is regulated by the Croatian Regulatory Authority for Network Industries (HAKOM), which issues broadcast licenses and monitors the market. The DVB-T and satellite transmission infrastructure is developed and maintained by the state-owned company Odašiljači i veze (OiV).

Dream Satellite TV Satellite television provider in the Philippines

Dream Satellite TV was the first all-digital Direct-To-Home (DTH) television broadcasting service via satellite in the Philippines. Broadcasting from the Dream Broadcast Center located at the Clark Special Economic Zone in Pampanga. Content is received from program providers, compressed and broadcast via Koreasat 5 in DVB-S and NTSC color format exclusively to its subscribers using the Integrated Receiver-Decoder and the Conax/Nagravision 3 Encryption System.

G-Sat is a subscription-based direct-to-home (DTH) satellite television service commercially available in the Philippines. G-Sat is owned by Global Satellite Technology Services (GSTS), registered in the Philippines with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). G-Sat also imported pay TV channels from Hong Kong, which TV shows and movies subtitled in Cantonese.

Satellite television varies in the different regions around the world.

ZAP (satellite television)

ZAP is a digital satellite television provider mainly for Portuguese-speaking countries in sub-Saharan Africa. ZAP launched in Angola in 2010, providing a subscription based TV service covering the sub-Saharan countries to south of Angola. ZAP operates from the Eutelsat W7 satellite, placed over Africa at 36,0 degrees East, broadcasting in DVB-S2 in five Ku band transponders with MPEG-4 compression and Nagravision encryption.

References

  1. "Frequenzliste Eutelsat II-F3, TV (12.6.96)".
  2. "THAI WAVE - Adresse, Telefonnummer, Anschrift, Telefaxnummer und Kontaktinformationen - Thailand". www.laenderkontakte.de. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03.