The Man from Yesterday (1949 film)

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The Man from Yesterday
Directed by Oswald Mitchell
Written by John Gilling
Produced by Harry Reynolds
Starring
Cinematography Cyril Bristow
Edited by Robert Johnson
Music by George Melachrino
Production
company
International Motion Pictures
Distributed by Renown Pictures
Release date
May 1949
Running time
68 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

The Man from Yesterday is a 1949 British thriller film directed by Oswald Mitchell and starring John Stuart, Henry Oscar and Marie Burke. [1] It was made at Southall Studios.

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References

  1. Chibnall & MacFarlane p.156

Bibliography