The Miracle Man (1932 film)

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The Miracle Man
TheMiracleMan1932Poster.jpg
Film poster
Directed by Norman Z. McLeod
Written by George M. Cohan (1914 play) [1]
Robert Hobart Davis
Samuel Hoffenstein
Frank L. Packard
Waldemar Young
Starring Sylvia Sidney
Chester Morris
Cinematography David Abel
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date
  • April 1, 1932 (1932-04-01)
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Miracle Man is a 1932 American pre-Code drama film directed by Norman Z. McLeod, [2] starring Sylvia Sidney and Chester Morris, and featuring Boris Karloff. It is a remake of the 1919 film of the same name starring Lon Chaney. The film was originally supposed to star Tyrone Power Sr., as the Preacher/Patriarch, but he died before major filming got underway. His part was then completed by Hobart Bosworth.

Contents

Plot

Doc, a crook in Chinatown, must flee when Nikko, a local bazaar owner, gets fresh with Doc's accomplice, Helen Smith, and Doc nearly kills him. Using the name John Madison, Doc hides out in Meadville, California, where he meets the Patriarch, a faith healer. Hoping to capitalize on the Patriarch's reputation, Doc sends for Helen to pose as the Patriarch's grand niece, Helen Vail, and she is joined by fellow crooks Frog, a contortionist, and Harry Evans, a pickpocket. Doc stages a mock miracle in which Frog is "transformed" from a crippled state to perfect health. At the same time, however, the Patriarch heals real cripples Bobbie Holmes and Margaret Thornton, who has come to Meadville with her millionaire brother Robert for the Patriarch's miracle cure. The miracles cause a great fervor, and Doc collects money in Helen's name from scores of believers, ostensibly to build a chapel. Robert falls in love with Helen, and one night, they get stranded on his yacht and Doc flies into a jealous rage, planning to kill Robert. Later, the Patriarch is nearing death, and Helen, Frog and Harry refuse to support Doc's extortion efforts. Doc is about to abscond with the chapel money, when Robert tells him he proposed to Helen, but was turned down because she loves Doc. Suddenly sorry for his greed, Doc returns the money and swears his love to Helen as the Patriarch dies.

Cast

See also

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References

  1. "The Miracle Man – Broadway Play – Original | IBDB".
  2. Sandra Brennan (2016). "The Miracle Man". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved August 9, 2015.