The Simpsons episode guides

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Cover of the first episode guide, The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family (1997) Simpsonsguide1.jpg
Cover of the first episode guide, The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family (1997)

Five official episode guides for American animated sitcom The Simpsons have been published by HarperCollins since 1997. The first guide covers seasons 1 to 8, while the following three cover seasons 9 to 14 (two seasons each). The fifth was released in 2010 and covers seasons 1 to 20.

An animated sitcom is a subgenre of the sitcom that is animated rather than live action.

<i>The Simpsons</i> American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical depiction of working-class life, epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture and society, television, and the human condition.

HarperCollins Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, Hachette and Macmillan. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987, together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons, acquired in 1990.

Contents

The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family

The first guide, The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family, was published in the fall of 1997. [1] It was edited by Ray Richmond and Antonia Coffman, and includes a foreword by series creator Matt Groening. As an in-joke, the guide made an actual appearance in the 2003 episode "Today I Am a Clown", where Lisa uses it to remind Homer that Santa's Little Helper was supposedly neutered in a previous episode (specifically, "Two Dozen and One Greyhounds").

Ray Richmond is a globally syndicated critic and entertainment/media columnist. Richmond has also worked variously as a feature and entertainment writer, beat reporter and TV critic for a variety of publications including the Los Angeles Daily News, Daily Variety, the Orange County Register, the late Los Angeles Herald Examiner, Deadline Hollywood, Los Angeles magazine, Buzz, The Hollywood Reporter, the Los Angeles Times, New Times Los Angeles, DGA Magazine, and Penthouse.

Matt Groening American cartoonist

Matthew Abraham Groening is an American cartoonist, writer, producer, animator, and voice actor. He is the creator of the comic strip Life in Hell (1977–2012) and the television series The Simpsons (1989–present), Futurama, and Disenchantment (2018–present). The Simpsons is the longest-running U.S. primetime-television series in history and the longest-running U.S. animated series and sitcom.

An in-joke, also known as an inside joke or a private joke, is a joke whose humour is understandable only to members of an ingroup, that is, people who are in a particular social group, occupation, or other community of shared interest. It is an esoteric joke that is humorous only to those who are aware of the circumstances behind it.

The guide provides an episode-by-episode history of the first eight seasons of The Simpsons. Each episode is covered in either one or two pages, featuring a synopsis, credits, pictures, and memorable quotes, as well as the episode's chalkboard gag. Obscure or hidden jokes are also brought to attention. The episodes are arranged in chronological order, and at the beginning of each season are two-page special features, such as a list and brief description of The Simpsons shorts from The Tracey Ullman Show , a list of times Homer has said "D'oh!", and a list of Itchy & Scratchy cartoons. On two pages there are short biographies of each of the five immediate members of the Simpson family, namely Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie. Short biographies of other Simpsons characters appear in sidebars to each episode's page, starting with Santa's Little Helper for "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" and ending with Willem Dafoe's Commandant from "The Secret War of Lisa Simpson".

<i>The Simpsons</i> shorts Special episode list for an animated series

The Simpsonsshorts are a series of animated shorts that aired as a recurring segment on Fox variety television series The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, before the characters spun off into The Simpsons, their own half-hour prime-time show. It features Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The series was created by Matt Groening, who designed the Simpson family and wrote many of the shorts. The shorts first aired on April 19, 1987 starting with "Good Night". The final short to air was "TV Simpsons", originally airing on May 14, 1989. The Simpsons later debuted on December 17, 1989, as an independent series with the Christmas special "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire".

<i>The Tracey Ullman Show</i> television program

The Tracey Ullman Show is an American television variety show starring Tracey Ullman. It debuted on Fox on April 5, 1987 and ran until May 26, 1990. The show was produced by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television. The show blended sketch comedy with musical numbers and dance routines, choreographed by Paula Abdul, along with animated shorts. The format was conceived by creator and executive producer James L. Brooks, who was looking to showcase the show's multitalented star. Brooks likened the show to producing three pilots a week. Ullman was the first British woman to be offered her own television sketch show in both the United Kingdom and the United States.

"D'oh!" is a catchphrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson, from the television series The Simpsons, an animated sitcom (1989–present). It is an exclamation typically used after Homer injures himself, realizes that he has done something stupid, or when something bad has happened or is about to happen to him. All his prominent blood relations—son Bart, daughters Lisa and Maggie, his father, his mother and half-brother—have also been heard to use it themselves in similar circumstances. On a few occasions Homer's wife Marge and even non-related characters such as Mr. Burns and Sideshow Bob have also used this phrase.

The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued

The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued is an episode guide for the ninth and tenth seasons of The Simpsons, starting with "The City of New York vs. Homer Simpson" and ending with "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo". The book is the first companion to the original The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family, and was also published by HarperCollins. The Simpsons Forever! was edited by Scott M. Gimple and released in 1999. [2]

"The City of New York vs. Homer Simpson" is the first episode of The Simpsons' ninth season. The 179th episode of the series overall, it was originally broadcast on the Fox network in the United States on September 21, 1997. The episode features the Simpson family traveling to Manhattan to recover the family car, which was taken by Barney Gumble and abandoned outside the World Trade Center, therefore gaining numerous parking tickets and a parking boot.

Scott M. Gimple writer

Scott Michael Gimple is an American writer for both comics and television. He is known for his work as a writer and producer for Fillmore!, Life, FlashForward, Chase, and The Walking Dead, and served as the showrunner for The Walking Dead from seasons 4 through 8.

Groening wrote an introduction to The Simpsons Forever!, just as he did with the original book. In his introduction, he claims that the choice was made to publish a second book as opposed to revising and republishing the last edition, to spare consumers from purchasing material they already owned. Groening goes on to describe the format of the book, which, like the last, includes synopses and quotes. The book continues the work of the last edition by listing the times Homer cries "D'oh!" or says "Mmm...", as well as new couch gags, but it includes unique features as well, including a tribute to Troy McClure, whose character was retired after his voice actor, Phil Hartman, was murdered. The guide also includes the lyrics to the Simpsons-related songs, "Do the Bartman" and "Deep, Deep Trouble".

Troy McClure Fictional character from The Simpsons franchise

Troy McClure is a fictional character in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. He was originally voiced by Phil Hartman and first appeared in the second season episode "Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment". McClure is an actor who is usually shown doing low-level work, such as hosting infomercials and educational films. He appears as the main character in "A Fish Called Selma", in which he marries Selma Bouvier to aid his failing career and quash rumors about his personal life. McClure also 'hosts' "The Simpsons 138th Episode Spectacular" and "The Simpsons Spin-Off Showcase".

Phil Hartman Canadian-American actor, comedian, screenwriter and graphic artist

Philip Edward Hartmann was a Canadian-American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and graphic artist. Born in Brantford, Ontario, Hartman and his family moved to the United States in 1958. After graduating from California State University, Northridge with a degree in graphic arts, he designed album covers for bands including Poco and America. Hartman joined the comedy group the Groundlings in 1975 and there helped comedian Paul Reubens develop his character Pee-wee Herman. Hartman co-wrote the film Pee-wee's Big Adventure and made recurring appearances as Captain Carl on Reubens's show Pee-wee's Playhouse.

Do the Bartman single

"Do the Bartman" is a song from the 1990 Simpsons album The Simpsons Sing the Blues. It was performed by The Simpsons cast member Nancy Cartwright, with backing vocals from Michael Jackson, alongside additional vocals from Dan Castellaneta. It was produced and written by American recording artist Bryan Loren, and released as a single on November 20, 1990.

The Simpsons Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Still Continued

The Simpsons Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Still Continued is an episode guide for the eleventh and twelfth seasons of The Simpsons. It was edited by Jesse L. McCann and published in 2002 by HarperCollins. [3] The book is a companion to the prior Simpsons episode guides. The book consists of synopses and quotes for each episode, beginning with "Beyond Blunderdome" and ending with "Simpsons Tall Tales". In this way it follows the last two books. However, this edition dedicates two pages of coverage to every episode, and four pages of coverage for each Halloween special. It thus outdoes the prior editions, which had one-to-two page coverage for each episode. The book also continues the work of the last two editions by listing the times Homer cries "D'oh!" or says "Mmm...", as well as new couch gags, but it includes unique features as well, like Church marquees. Sketches from the early production are included.

"Beyond Blunderdome" is the eleventh season premiere of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on September 26, 1999, and was watched in around 8.1 million homes during the broadcast. In the episode, the Simpsons are given free tickets to a preview screening of Mel Gibson's new film, a remake of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Gibson laments his current non-violent role and wants someone to give him criticism. When Homer sees Gibson talking with Marge, he gives him a brutal review, leading Gibson to believe that Homer is the only man brave enough to give suggestions. As a result, he hires him to create a better ending. However, when the ending proves to be too controversial, Gibson and Homer end up on the run from studio executives with the film.

"Simpsons Tall Tales" is the twenty-first episode and season finale of The Simpsons' twelfth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 20, 2001. In the episode, Homer refuses to pay a five dollar airport tax to fly to Delaware, which forces the family to ride in a livestock car of a train instead. There they meet a singing hobo who tells three tall tales which include Homer as Paul Bunyan, Lisa as Connie Appleseed and Bart and Nelson as Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn respectively.

Groening wrote an introduction to the book, as he had for the previous editions. In it, he refers to the eleventh and twelfth seasons as the "Wackier-Than-Ever Years", and explains that it had been the objective to take the series in unexpected directions. To this end, the character Apu became the father of octuplets ("Eight Misbehavin'") and Homer lost a thumb ("Trilogy of Error"). Groening also acknowledges the death of the character Maude Flanders during this timeframe ("Alone Again, Natura-Diddily"), saying that it was "funny, funny stuff — well, weird, anyway." Groening goes on to claim that these two seasons contained some of his personal favorite scenes from all the series. He lists among these the farm animals driven insane by the food product tomacco ("E-I-E-I-(Annoyed Grunt)") and the portrayal of the dolphins enslaving mankind ("Treehouse of Horror XI"). He also identifies the episode "Worst Episode Ever" as one he particularly enjoyed, calling it "a very special story."

The Simpsons One Step Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued Yet Again

The Simpsons One Step Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued Yet Again is the third sequel to the Simpsons episode guide The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family. It was edited by Jesse L. McCann and like its predecessors, has an episode-by-episode guide to seasons 13 and 14 of The Simpsons. [4] Each season begins with production art and ends with character designs. The first episode covered in the book is "Treehouse of Horror XII", the last being "Moe Baby Blues". Each episode guide includes quotes, a "Stuff You May Have Missed" section, and references to films, television shows, and books. As in the previous three books, each episode includes a character profile sidebar. All special guest stars appearing in seasons 13–14 are listed with the episode they appeared in. The last pages of the book include character designs, couch gags, Homer's "D'oh!"s and "Mmmmm"s, an Itchy & Scratchy filmography, a "Who Does What Voice" section, songs featured on the show, and Church marquees.

Simpsons World: The Ultimate Episode Guide: Seasons 1–20

Simpsons World: The Ultimate Episode Guide: Seasons 1–20 is the fourth sequel to the Simpsons episode guide The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family. The book covers seasons one to twenty, covering "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" through "Coming to Homerica". The book was released on October 26, 2010 in the United States. [5] Like its predecessors, it uses the same basic structure; however, the guide to each episode occupies two pages, giving every episode from seasons one to ten double pages.

Editions

Publishing dateSeasons
covered
Book titleEditionTag Imprint Pages
October 3, 1997
1–8 (178 episodes)
The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family1stUSA HarperPerennial [6]
256
November 11, 1997
1–8 (178 episodes)
The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family1stUK HarperCollins Entertainment [7]
256
November 3, 1999
9–10 (48 episodes)
The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued1stUSA HarperPerennial [8]
96
November 3, 1999
9–10 (48 episodes)
The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued1stUK HarperCollins Entertainment [9]
96
October 22, 2002
11–12 (43 episodes)
The Simpsons Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Still Continued1stUSA HarperPerennial
128
October 11, 2005
13–14 (44 episodes)
The Simpsons One Step Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family ...Continued Yet Again1stUSA Harper
128
October 26, 2010
1–20 (441 episodes)
Simpsons World: The Ultimate Episode Guide, Seasons 1–201stUSA Harper
1200

Related Research Articles

Maggie Simpson fictional character from The Simpsons franchise

Margaret "Maggie" Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. She first appeared on television in the Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Maggie was created and designed by cartoonist Matt Groening while he was waiting in the lobby of James L. Brooks' office. She received her first name from Groening's youngest sister. After appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show for three years, the Simpson family was given their own series on the Fox Broadcasting Company which debuted December 17, 1989.

"Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire", also known as "The Simpsons Christmas Special", is the series premiere episode of The Simpsons. It was the first episode to air despite originally being the eighth episode produced for season one. It is the only full-length episode to air during the 1980s, having originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on December 17, 1989.

"Bart the Genius" is the second episode of The Simpsons' first season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 14, 1990. It was the first episode written by Jon Vitti. It is also the show's first normal episode, as well as the first to feature the iconic opening sequence, though this version is much different than the one used from the second season to the twentieth season. In the episode, Bart cheats on an intelligence test and is declared a genius, so he is sent to a school for gifted children. Though he initially enjoys being treated as a genius, he begins to see the downside of his new life.

Some Enchanted Evening (<i>The Simpsons</i>) 13th episode of the first season of The Simpsons

"Some Enchanted Evening" is the thirteenth and final episode of The Simpsons' first season. It was originally broadcast on the Fox network in the United States on May 13, 1990. Written by Matt Groening and Sam Simon and directed by David Silverman and Kent Butterworth, "Some Enchanted Evening" was the first episode produced for season one and was intended to air as the series premiere in fall 1989, but aired as the season one finale due to animation issues. The Christmas special "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" premiered in its place on December 17, 1989. It is the last episode to feature the original opening sequence starting from "Bart the Genius". In the episode, Homer and Marge go on a night out while leaving the children under the care of a diabolical babysitter named Ms. Botz.

"Grade School Confidential" is the nineteenth episode of The Simpsons' eighth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on April 6, 1997. It was written by Rachel Pulido and directed by Susie Dietter. The episode establishes the long-term relationship between Seymour Skinner and Edna Krabappel. Bart witnesses a romantic moment between Principal Skinner and Mrs. Krabappel and acts as a snitch for them. However, they later embarrass him and he exposes their romance to the public.

"Another Simpsons Clip Show" is the third episode of The Simpsons' sixth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on September 25, 1994. In the episode, Marge reads a romance novel in bed, and it prompts her to have a family meeting, where the Simpson family recall their past loves in form of clips from previous episodes.

"Bart's Comet" is the fourteenth episode of The Simpsons' sixth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on February 5, 1995. In the episode, Bart Simpson accidentally discovers a comet, which is heading towards Springfield. The show's writing staff saw an issue of Time magazine that presented the threat of comets hitting Earth on its cover, and decided to create an episode in a similar vein. John Swartzwelder wrote the script, while Bob Anderson directed. "Bart's Comet" contains references to Where's Waldo? and The Twilight Zone, and received positive commendations from reviewers.

"Duffless" is the sixteenth episode of The Simpsons' fourth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on February 18, 1993. After getting arrested for drunk driving, Homer tries to remain sober, at Marge's request. Meanwhile, Lisa attempts to prove that Bart is less intelligent than a hamster after he ruins her first science fair project. It was written by David M. Stern, and directed by Jim Reardon. The episode received a positive reception.

"Bart Carny" is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons' ninth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 11, 1998. Homer and Bart start working at a carnival and befriend a father and son duo named Cooder and Spud. It was written by John Swartzwelder, directed by Mark Kirkland and guest stars Jim Varney as Cooder the carny. The episode contains several cultural references and received a generally mixed critical reception.

<i>The Simpsons</i> (season 1) Episode list for season of animated series

The first season of the American animated television series The Simpsons originally aired on the Fox network between December 17, 1989 and May 13, 1990, beginning with the Christmas special "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire". The executive producers for the first production season were Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, and Sam Simon.

<i>The Simpsons</i> (season 8) Episode list for season of animated series

The Simpsons' eighth season originally aired on the Fox network between October 27, 1996, and May 18, 1997, beginning with "Treehouse of Horror VII". The showrunners for the eighth production season were Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein. The aired season contained two episodes that were hold-over episodes from season seven, which Oakley and Weinstein also ran. It also contained two episodes for which Al Jean and Mike Reiss were the show runners.

<i>The Simpsons</i> (season 5) Episode list for season of animated series

The Simpsons' fifth season originally aired on the Fox network between September 30, 1993 and May 19, 1994. The showrunner for the fifth production season was David Mirkin who executive produced 20 episodes. Al Jean and Mike Reiss executive produced the remaining two, which were both hold overs that were produced for the previous season. The season contains some of the series' most acclaimed and popular episodes, including "Cape Feare", "Homer Goes to College" and "Rosebud". It also includes the 100th episode, "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song". The season was nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards and won an Annie Award for Best Animated Television Program as well as an Environmental Media Award and a Genesis Award. The DVD box set was released in Region 1 on December 21, 2004, Region 2 on March 21, 2005, and Region 4 on March 23, 2005.

<i>The Simpsons</i> (season 3) Episode list for season of animated series

The Simpsons' third season originally aired on the Fox network between September 19, 1991 and August 27, 1992. The showrunners for the third production season were Al Jean and Mike Reiss who executive produced 22 episodes for the season, while two other episodes were produced by James L. Brooks, Matt Groening, and Sam Simon. An additional episode, "Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?", aired on August 27, 1992 after the official end of the third season and is included on the Season 3 DVD set. Season three won six Primetime Emmy Awards for "Outstanding Voice-Over Performance" and also received a nomination for "Outstanding Animated Program" for the episode "Radio Bart". The complete season was released on DVD in Region 1 on August 26, 2003, Region 2 on October 6, 2003, and in Region 4 on October 22, 2003.

<i>The Simpsons</i> (season 2) Episode list for season of animated series

The Simpsons' second season originally aired on the Fox network between October 11, 1990 and July 11, 1991, and contained 22 episodes, beginning with "Bart Gets an "F"". Another episode, "Blood Feud", aired during the summer after the official season finale. The executive producers for the second production season were Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, and Sam Simon, who had also been EPs for the previous season. The DVD box set was released on August 6, 2002 in Region 1, July 8, 2002 in Region 2 and in September, 2002 in Region 4. The episode "Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment" won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program, and was also nominated in the "Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special" category.

Good Night (<i>The Simpsons</i>) The Simpsons short

"Good Night" is the first of forty-eight Simpsons shorts that appeared on the variety show The Tracey Ullman Show. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on April 19, 1987, during the third episode of The Tracey Ullman Show and marks the first appearance of the Simpson family — Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie — on television. After three seasons on Tracey Ullman, the shorts would be adapted into the animated show The Simpsons. "Good Night" has since been aired on the show in the episode "The Simpsons 138th Episode Spectacular", along with several other Ullman shorts, and is one of the few shorts to ever be released on DVD, being included in the Season 1 DVD set.

References

  1. HarperCollins Staff (October 3, 1997). "The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family by Matt Groening" (About the book). HarperCollins . Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  2. HarperCollins Staff (November 3, 1999). "The Simpsons Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family...Continued by Matt Groening" (About the book). HarperCollins . Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  3. HarperCollins Staff (October 22, 2002). "The Simpsons Beyond Forever!: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family...Still Continued by Matt Groening" (About the book). HarperCollins . Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  4. HarperCollins Staff (October 11, 2005). "The Simpsons One Step Beyond Forever: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family...Continued Yet Again by Matt Groening" (About the book). HarperCollins . Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  5. HarperCollins Staff (October 26, 2010). "Simpsons World The Ultimate Episode Guide: Seasons 1–20 by Matt Groening" (About the book). HarperCollins . Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  6. Richmond & Coffman & 1997 (USA).
  7. Richmond & Coffman & 1997 (UK).
  8. Gimple & 1999 (USA).
  9. Gimple & 1999 (UK).
Bibliography